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Open AccessArticle

Energy Band Gap Investigation of Biomaterials: A Comprehensive Material Approach for Biocompatibility of Medical Electronic Devices

1
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA
2
Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA
3
Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Micromachines 2020, 11(1), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11010105
Received: 6 December 2019 / Revised: 13 January 2020 / Accepted: 15 January 2020 / Published: 18 January 2020
Over the past ten years, tissue engineering has witnessed significant technological and scientific advancements. Progress in both stem cell science and additive manufacturing have established new horizons in research and are poised to bring improvements in healthcare closer to reality. However, more sophisticated indications such as the scale-up fabrication of biological structures (e.g., human tissues and organs) still require standardization. To that end, biocompatible electronics may be helpful in the biofabrication process. Here, we report the results of our systematic exploration to seek biocompatible/degradable functional electronic materials that could be used for electronic device fabrications. We investigated the electronic properties of various biomaterials in terms of energy diagrams, and the energy band gaps of such materials were obtained using optical absorption spectroscopy. The main component of an electronic device is manufactured with semiconductor materials (i.e., Eg between 1 to 2.5 eV). Most biomaterials showed an optical absorption edge greater than 2.5 eV. For example, fibrinogen, glycerol, and gelatin showed values of 3.54, 3.02, and 3.0 eV, respectively. Meanwhile, a few materials used in the tissue engineering field were found to be semiconductors, such as the phenol red in cell culture media (1.96 eV energy band gap). The data from this research may be used to fabricate biocompatible/degradable electronic devices for medical applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy band gap; optical absorption; biomaterial; bio-optoelectronics; advanced biomanufacturing energy band gap; optical absorption; biomaterial; bio-optoelectronics; advanced biomanufacturing
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Shafiee, A.; Ghadiri, E.; Kassis, J.; Williams, D.; Atala, A. Energy Band Gap Investigation of Biomaterials: A Comprehensive Material Approach for Biocompatibility of Medical Electronic Devices. Micromachines 2020, 11, 105.

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