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Review

In Vivo Tracking of Tissue Engineered Constructs

1
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Emory University School of Medicine and Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2
Precision Health Program, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
3
Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
4
Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30309, USA
5
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Micromachines 2019, 10(7), 474; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070474
Received: 2 July 2019 / Revised: 10 July 2019 / Accepted: 13 July 2019 / Published: 16 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine)
To date, the fields of biomaterials science and tissue engineering have shown great promise in creating bioartificial tissues and organs for use in a variety of regenerative medicine applications. With the emergence of new technologies such as additive biomanufacturing and 3D bioprinting, increasingly complex tissue constructs are being fabricated to fulfill the desired patient-specific requirements. Fundamental to the further advancement of this field is the design and development of imaging modalities that can enable visualization of the bioengineered constructs following implantation, at adequate spatial and temporal resolution and high penetration depths. These in vivo tracking techniques should introduce minimum toxicity, disruption, and destruction to treated tissues, while generating clinically relevant signal-to-noise ratios. This article reviews the imaging techniques that are currently being adopted in both research and clinical studies to track tissue engineering scaffolds in vivo, with special attention to 3D bioprinted tissue constructs. View Full-Text
Keywords: in vivo imaging; tissue engineering; 3D bioprinting; additive manufacturing; scaffold tracking; magnetic resonant imaging (MRI); computed tomography (CT); ultrasound; fluorescence spectroscopy; bioluminescence; optical coherence tomography; photoacoustic imaging; magnetic-particle imaging; multimodal imaging in vivo imaging; tissue engineering; 3D bioprinting; additive manufacturing; scaffold tracking; magnetic resonant imaging (MRI); computed tomography (CT); ultrasound; fluorescence spectroscopy; bioluminescence; optical coherence tomography; photoacoustic imaging; magnetic-particle imaging; multimodal imaging
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gil, C.J.; Tomov, M.L.; Theus, A.S.; Cetnar, A.; Mahmoudi, M.; Serpooshan, V. In Vivo Tracking of Tissue Engineered Constructs. Micromachines 2019, 10, 474. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070474

AMA Style

Gil CJ, Tomov ML, Theus AS, Cetnar A, Mahmoudi M, Serpooshan V. In Vivo Tracking of Tissue Engineered Constructs. Micromachines. 2019; 10(7):474. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070474

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gil, Carmen J., Martin L. Tomov, Andrea S. Theus, Alexander Cetnar, Morteza Mahmoudi, and Vahid Serpooshan. 2019. "In Vivo Tracking of Tissue Engineered Constructs" Micromachines 10, no. 7: 474. https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070474

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