Next Article in Journal
A Modified Duhem Model for Rate-Dependent Hysteresis Behaviors
Previous Article in Journal
CO2 Laser Fabrication of PMMA Microfluidic Double T-Junction Device with Modified Inlet-Angle for Cost-Effective PCR Application
Open AccessArticle

Three-Dimensional Bioprinting of Functional Skeletal Muscle Tissue Using Gelatin Methacryloyl-Alginate Bioinks

1
Department of Bioengineering, Samueli School of Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
Center for Minimally Invasive Therapeutics (C-MIT), University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3
College of Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MI 65211, USA
4
Department of Stem Cell Sciences, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara 06100, Turkey
5
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11365-11155, Iran
6
Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Micromachines 2019, 10(10), 679; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10100679
Received: 20 September 2019 / Revised: 4 October 2019 / Accepted: 6 October 2019 / Published: 9 October 2019
Skeletal muscle tissue engineering aims to fabricate tissue constructs to replace or restore diseased or injured skeletal muscle tissues in the body. Several biomaterials and microscale technologies have been used in muscle tissue engineering. However, it is still challenging to mimic the function and structure of the native muscle tissues. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a powerful tool to mimic the hierarchical structure of native tissues. Here, 3D bioprinting was used to fabricate tissue constructs using gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA)-alginate bioinks. Mechanical and rheological properties of GelMA-alginate hydrogels were characterized. C2C12 myoblasts at the density 8 × 106 cells/mL were used as the cell model. The effects of alginate concentration (0, 6, and 8% (w/v)) and crosslinking mechanism (UV crosslinking or ionic crosslinking with UV crosslinking) on printability, cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation of bioinks were studied. The results showed that 10% (w/v) GelMA-8% (w/v) alginate crosslinked using UV light and 0.1 M CaCl2 provided the optimum niche to induce muscle tissue formation compared to other hydrogel compositions. Furthermore, metabolic activity of cells in GelMA bioinks was improved by addition of oxygen-generating particles to the bioinks. It is hoped that such bioprinted muscle tissues may find wide applications in drug screening and tissue regeneration. View Full-Text
Keywords: muscle tissue engineering; GelMA-alginate bioink; 3D bioprinting; oxygen-generating bioink muscle tissue engineering; GelMA-alginate bioink; 3D bioprinting; oxygen-generating bioink
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Seyedmahmoud, R.; Çelebi-Saltik, B.; Barros, N.; Nasiri, R.; Banton, E.; Shamloo, A.; Ashammakhi, N.; Dokmeci, M.R.; Ahadian, S. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting of Functional Skeletal Muscle Tissue Using Gelatin Methacryloyl-Alginate Bioinks. Micromachines 2019, 10, 679.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop