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Article

Transfer of Ochratoxin A into Tea and Coffee Beverages

1
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Kralove, 50003 Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic
2
National Reference Center for Microfungi and Mycotoxins in Food Chains, Center of Health, Nutrition and Food in Brno, National Institute of Public Health in Prague, 61242 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Department Bioprocess & Microbial Systems, Laboratory Chemical Engineering, INP/ENSA Toulouse, University of Toulouse, UMR 5503 CNRS/INPT/UPS, 31320 Auzeville-Tolosane, France
4
Ecole des mines d'Ales, 6 av de Clavieres, 30100 Ales Cedex, France
5
National Reference Laboratory for Biomarkers of Mycotoxins and Mycotoxins in Food, Institute of Public Health in Usti nad Labem, Regional Branch Hradec Kralove, 50002 Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2014, 6(12), 3438-3453; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins6123438
Received: 14 October 2014 / Revised: 6 December 2014 / Accepted: 11 December 2014 / Published: 17 December 2014
Ochratoxin A (OTA) is nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, immunotoxic, neurotoxic, reprotoxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic (group 2B), being characterized by species and sex differences in sensitivity. Despite the fact that OTA is in some aspects a controversial topic, OTA is the most powerful renal carcinogen. The aim of this study was to make a small survey concerning OTA content in black tea, fruit tea, and ground roasted coffee, and to assess OTA transfer into beverages. OTA content was measured using a validated and accredited HPLC-FLD method with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.35 ng/g. The OTA amount ranged from LOQ up to 250 ng/g in black tea and up to 104 ng/g in fruit tea. Black tea and fruit tea, naturally contaminated, were used to prepare tea infusions. The transfer from black tea to the infusion was 34.8% ± 1.3% and from fruit tea 4.1% ± 0.2%. Ground roasted coffee naturally contaminated at 0.92 ng/g was used to prepare seven kinds of coffee beverages. Depending on the type of process used, OTA transfer into coffee ranged from 22.3% to 66.1%. OTA intakes from fruit and black tea or coffee represent a non-negligible human source. View Full-Text
Keywords: ochratoxin A; OTA; black tea; fruit tea; coffee; OTA transfer into beverages ochratoxin A; OTA; black tea; fruit tea; coffee; OTA transfer into beverages
MDPI and ACS Style

Malir, F.; Ostry, V.; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, A.; Toman, J.; Bazin, I.; Roubal, T. Transfer of Ochratoxin A into Tea and Coffee Beverages. Toxins 2014, 6, 3438-3453. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins6123438

AMA Style

Malir F, Ostry V, Pfohl-Leszkowicz A, Toman J, Bazin I, Roubal T. Transfer of Ochratoxin A into Tea and Coffee Beverages. Toxins. 2014; 6(12):3438-3453. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins6123438

Chicago/Turabian Style

Malir, Frantisek, Vladimir Ostry, Annie Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Jakub Toman, Ingrid Bazin, and Tomas Roubal. 2014. "Transfer of Ochratoxin A into Tea and Coffee Beverages" Toxins 6, no. 12: 3438-3453. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins6123438

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