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Toxins 2018, 10(10), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins10100390

C-Type Lectin-20 Interacts with ALP1 Receptor to Reduce Cry Toxicity in Aedes aegypti

1
State Key Laboratory of Ecological Pest Control for Fujian and Taiwan Crops, College of Life Sciences, Key Lab of Biopesticides and Chemical Biology, MOE, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian, China
2
Key Laboratory of Genetics, Breeding and Comprehensive Utilization of Crops, Ministry of Education, College of Crop Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian, China
3
Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110, USA
4
Fujian International Travel Healthcare Center, Fuzhou 350001, Fujian, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 7 September 2018 / Accepted: 20 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticidal Toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis)
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Abstract

Aedes aegypti is a crucial vector for human diseases, such as yellow fever, dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Today, a major challenge throughout the globe is the insufficient availability of antiviral drugs and vaccines against arboviruses, and toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are still used as biological agents for mosquito control. The use of Cry toxins to kill insects mainly depends on the interaction between Cry toxins and important toxin receptors, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In this study, we investigated the function of A. aegypti C-type lectin-20 (CTL-20) in the tolerance of Cry toxins. We showed that recombinant CTL-20 protein interacted with both Cry11Aa and ALP1 by the Far-Western blot and ELISA methods, and CTL-20 bound to A. aegypti larval brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs). Binding affinity of CTL-20 to ALP1 was higher than that of Cry11Aa to ALP1. Furthermore, the survival rate of A. aegypti larvae fed with Cry11Aa toxin mixed with recombinant CTL-20 fusion protein was significantly increased compared with that of the control larvae fed with Cry11Aa mixed with thioredoxin. Our novel results suggest that midgut proteins like CTLs may interfere with interactions between Cry toxins and toxin receptors by binding to both Cry toxins and receptors to alter Cry toxicity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aedes aegypti; C-type lectin; Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11A; alkaline phosphatase; toxicity Aedes aegypti; C-type lectin; Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11A; alkaline phosphatase; toxicity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Batool, K.; Alam, I.; Zhao, G.; Wang, J.; Xu, J.; Yu, X.; Huang, E.; Guan, X.; Zhang, L. C-Type Lectin-20 Interacts with ALP1 Receptor to Reduce Cry Toxicity in Aedes aegypti. Toxins 2018, 10, 390.

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