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Nutrients 2017, 9(8), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9080876

Correction
Correction: Gupta, P.M.; et al. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States Nutrients 2016, 8, 330
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 14 August 2017 / Published: 15 August 2017
We would like to submit the following correction to our recently published paper [1] due to the error in classification of children as anemic. The details are as follows:
(1)
The sentence in abstract “Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively.” has been changed as “Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.9% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively.”
(2)
In the last paragraph of Section 2, the sentence “Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration <11.0 g/dL” has been changed as “Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration <11.0 g/dL for children 6–59 months and <11.5 g/dL for children 60–72 months”.
(3)
In Section 3, the last two sentences have been changed as “The prevalence of anemia and IDA were 3.9% and 1.1%, respectively (Table 1). Approximately 28% of children who were anemic were iron deficient”.
(4)
Table 1 has been changed as:
(5)
The first sentence of the last paragraph in Section 3 has been changed as “The prevalence of ID was higher among children aged 1–2 years (p < 0.05)”.
(6)
In Section 4, the sentence “Our results showing the prevalence of anemia and IDA, among children 1–5 years, as 3.2% and 1.1% respectively, suggests little change in these indicators over the past decade.” has been changed as “Our results showing the prevalence of anemia and IDA among children 1–5 years as 3.9% and 1.1%, respectively, suggests little change in these indicators over the past decade.”
We apologize for any inconvenience caused to our readers.

Reference

  1. Gupta, P.M.; Perrine, C.G.; Mei, Z.; Scanlon, K.S. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States. Nutrients 2016, 8, 330. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Table 1. Prevalence of iron deficiency, anemia, and iron deficiency anemia among children 1–5 years in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010.
Table 1. Prevalence of iron deficiency, anemia, and iron deficiency anemia among children 1–5 years in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010.
nIron Deficiency 1Anemia 2Iron Deficiency Anemia 3
%95% Confidence Interval%95% Confidence Interval%95% Confidence Interval
1–5 years
(12–71.9 months)
14377.1(5.5, 8.7)3.9(2.5, 5.3)1.1(0.6, 1.7)
1–2 years
(12–35.9 months)
64313.5 *(9.8, 17.2)5.4(3.5, 7.4)2.7(1.2, 4.2)
3–5 years
(36–71.9 months)
7943.7(1.9, 5.5)3.1(1.4, 4.7)- **-

© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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