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Systematic Review

Role of Beta-Carotene in Lung Cancer Primary Chemoprevention: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression

1
Department of Thoracic, General and Oncological Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, 90-151 Lodz, Poland
2
Department of Microbiology and Laboratory Medical Immunology, Medical University of Lodz, 90-151 Lodz, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Roberto Iacone
Nutrients 2022, 14(7), 1361; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071361
Received: 19 January 2022 / Revised: 20 March 2022 / Accepted: 22 March 2022 / Published: 24 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carotene and Carotenoids and Human Health)
Lung cancer is one of the most common neoplasms globally, with about 2.2 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths annually. Although the most important factor in reducing lung cancer risk is lifestyle change, most patients favour the use of supplements, for example, rather than quitting smoking or following a healthy diet. To better understand the efficacy of such interventions, a systematic review was performed of data from randomized controlled trials concerning the influence of beta-carotene supplementation on lung cancer risk in subjects with no lung cancer before the intervention. The search corpus comprised a number of databases and eight studies involving 167,141 participants, published by November 2021. The findings indicate that beta-carotene supplementation was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (RR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06–1.26). This effect was even more noticeable among smokers and asbestos workers (RR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.08–1.35) and non-medics (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.07–1.29). A meta-regression found no relationship between the beta-carotene supplementation dose and the size of the negative effect associated with lung cancer risk. Our findings indicate that beta-carotene supplementation has no effect on lung cancer risk. Moreover, when used as the primary chemoprevention, beta-carotene may, in fact, increase the risk of lung cancer. View Full-Text
Keywords: beta-carotene; lung cancer; prophylaxis beta-carotene; lung cancer; prophylaxis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kordiak, J.; Bielec, F.; Jabłoński, S.; Pastuszak-Lewandoska, D. Role of Beta-Carotene in Lung Cancer Primary Chemoprevention: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression. Nutrients 2022, 14, 1361. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071361

AMA Style

Kordiak J, Bielec F, Jabłoński S, Pastuszak-Lewandoska D. Role of Beta-Carotene in Lung Cancer Primary Chemoprevention: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression. Nutrients. 2022; 14(7):1361. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071361

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kordiak, Jacek, Filip Bielec, Sławomir Jabłoński, and Dorota Pastuszak-Lewandoska. 2022. "Role of Beta-Carotene in Lung Cancer Primary Chemoprevention: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression" Nutrients 14, no. 7: 1361. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14071361

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