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Article

Effectiveness of “Moro” Blood Orange Citrus sinensis Osbeck (Rutaceae) Standardized Extract on Weight Loss in Overweight but Otherwise Healthy Men and Women—A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

1
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
2
RDC Clinical, Newstead, Brisbane, QLD 4005, Australia
3
Department of Drug and Health Science, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Zoltan Pataky
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030427
Received: 27 December 2021 / Revised: 12 January 2022 / Accepted: 14 January 2022 / Published: 18 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Phytochemicals and Human Health)
This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a blood orange Citrus sinensis standardized extract from “Moro” cultivar, on weight loss in overweight but otherwise healthy individuals. Anthocyanins and particularly cyanidin 3-glucoside, found in a large variety of fruits including Sicilian blood oranges, can help to counteract weight gain and to reduce body fat accumulation through the modulation of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and metabolic pathways. In this randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study, all participants (overweight adults aged 20–65 years old) were randomized to receive either Moro blood orange standardized extract or a placebo daily for 6-months. The primary outcome measure was change in body mass and body composition at the end of the study. After 6-months, body mass (4.2% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.015), body mass index (p = 0.019), hip (3.4 cm vs. 2.0 cm, p = 0.049) and waist (3.9 cm vs. 1.7 cm, p = 0.017) circumferences, fat mass (p = 0.012) and fat distribution (visceral and subcutaneous fat p = 0.018 and 0.006, respectively) were all significantly better in the extract supplemented group compared to the placebo (p < 0.05). In addition, all safety markers of liver toxicity were within the normal range throughout the study for both analyzed groups. Concluding, the present study demonstrates that Moro blood orange standardized extract may be a safe and effective option for helping with weight loss when used in conjunction with diet and exercise. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyanidin 3-glucoside; flavonoids; BMI; fat distribution; body mass; physical activity cyanidin 3-glucoside; flavonoids; BMI; fat distribution; body mass; physical activity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Briskey, D.; Malfa, G.A.; Rao, A. Effectiveness of “Moro” Blood Orange Citrus sinensis Osbeck (Rutaceae) Standardized Extract on Weight Loss in Overweight but Otherwise Healthy Men and Women—A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study. Nutrients 2022, 14, 427. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030427

AMA Style

Briskey D, Malfa GA, Rao A. Effectiveness of “Moro” Blood Orange Citrus sinensis Osbeck (Rutaceae) Standardized Extract on Weight Loss in Overweight but Otherwise Healthy Men and Women—A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study. Nutrients. 2022; 14(3):427. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030427

Chicago/Turabian Style

Briskey, David, Giuseppe Antonio Malfa, and Amanda Rao. 2022. "Effectiveness of “Moro” Blood Orange Citrus sinensis Osbeck (Rutaceae) Standardized Extract on Weight Loss in Overweight but Otherwise Healthy Men and Women—A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study" Nutrients 14, no. 3: 427. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030427

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