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Extensive Study of Breast Milk and Infant Growth: Protocol of the Cambridge Baby Growth and Breastfeeding Study (CBGS-BF)

1
Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
2
Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, 6545 CJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands
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NIZO Food Research BV, 6718 ZB Ede, The Netherlands
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Department of Medical Affairs, Mead Johnson Nutrition, Evansville, IN 47721, USA
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Wellcome-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
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MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0SL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Deceased.
Academic Editor: Johannes B. van Goudoever
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2879; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082879
Received: 23 July 2021 / Revised: 13 August 2021 / Accepted: 19 August 2021 / Published: 21 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Pediatric Nutrition)
Growth and nutrition during early life have been strongly linked to future health and metabolic risks. The Cambridge Baby Growth Study (CBGS), a longitudinal birth cohort of 2229 mother–infant pairs, was set up in 2001 to investigate early life determinant factors of infant growth and body composition in the UK setting. To carry out extensive profiling of breastmilk intakes and composition in relation to infancy growth, the Cambridge Baby Growth and Breastfeeding Study (CBGS-BF) was established upon the original CBGS. The strict inclusion criteria were applied, focusing on a normal birth weight vaginally delivered infant cohort born of healthy and non-obese mothers. Crucially, only infants who were exclusively breastfed for the first 6 weeks of life were retained in the analysed study sample. At each visit from birth, 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and then at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months, longitudinal anthropometric measurements and blood spot collections were conducted. Infant body composition was assessed using air displacement plethysmography (ADP) at 6 weeks and 3 months of age. Breast milk was collected for macronutrients and human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) measurements. Breast milk intake volume was also estimated, as well as sterile breastmilk and infant stool collection for microbiome study. View Full-Text
Keywords: infant growth; breast milk; early life; cohort profile; infant nutrition; breast milk nutrients; human milk oligosaccharides; breastfeeding; childhood obesity; prevention infant growth; breast milk; early life; cohort profile; infant nutrition; breast milk nutrients; human milk oligosaccharides; breastfeeding; childhood obesity; prevention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Olga, L.; Petry, C.J.; van Diepen, J.A.; Prentice, P.M.; Hughes, I.A.; Vervoort, J.; Boekhorst, J.; Chichlowski, M.; Gross, G.; Dunger, D.B.; Ong, K.K. Extensive Study of Breast Milk and Infant Growth: Protocol of the Cambridge Baby Growth and Breastfeeding Study (CBGS-BF). Nutrients 2021, 13, 2879. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082879

AMA Style

Olga L, Petry CJ, van Diepen JA, Prentice PM, Hughes IA, Vervoort J, Boekhorst J, Chichlowski M, Gross G, Dunger DB, Ong KK. Extensive Study of Breast Milk and Infant Growth: Protocol of the Cambridge Baby Growth and Breastfeeding Study (CBGS-BF). Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2879. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082879

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olga, Laurentya, Clive J. Petry, Janna A. van Diepen, Philippa M. Prentice, Ieuan A. Hughes, Jacques Vervoort, Jos Boekhorst, Maciej Chichlowski, Gabriele Gross, David B. Dunger, and Ken K. Ong. 2021. "Extensive Study of Breast Milk and Infant Growth: Protocol of the Cambridge Baby Growth and Breastfeeding Study (CBGS-BF)" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2879. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082879

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