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Article

A Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Consuming 100% Orange Juice or Sucrose-Sweetened Beverage on Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Disease in Women

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Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
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Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine (V.M.), University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
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Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
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Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Davis, CA 95616, USA
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Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94155, USA
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Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
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Basic Sciences, Touro University of California, Vallejo, CA 94592, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Bernadette P. Marriott
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030760
Received: 30 December 2020 / Revised: 30 January 2021 / Accepted: 1 February 2021 / Published: 26 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Clinical Nutrition)
Overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages increases risk factors associated with cardiometabolic disease, in part due to hepatic fructose overload. However, it is not clear whether consumption of beverages containing fructose as naturally occurring sugar produces equivalent metabolic dysregulation as beverages containing added sugars. We compared the effects of consuming naturally-sweetened orange juice (OJ) or sucrose-sweetened beverages (sucrose-SB) for two weeks on risk factors for cardiometabolic disease. Healthy, overweight women (n = 20) were assigned to consume either 3 servings of 100% orange juice or sucrose-SB/day. We conducted 16-hour serial blood collections and 3-h oral glucose tolerance tests during a 30-h inpatient visit at baseline and after the 2-week diet intervention. The 16-h area under the curve (AUC) for uric acid increased in subjects consuming sucrose-SB compared with subjects consuming OJ. Unlike sucrose-SB, OJ did not significantly increase fasting or postprandial lipoproteins. Consumption of both beverages resulted in reductions in the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (OJ: −0.40 ± 0.18, p = 0.04 within group; sucrose-SB: −1.0 ± 0.38, p = 0.006 within group; p = 0.53 between groups). Findings from this pilot study suggest that consumption of OJ at levels above the current dietary guidelines for sugar intake does not increase plasma uric acid concentrations compared with sucrose-SB, but appears to lead to comparable decreases of insulin sensitivity. View Full-Text
Keywords: fruit juice; sugar-sweetened beverage; uric acid; lipids; insulin sensitivity fruit juice; sugar-sweetened beverage; uric acid; lipids; insulin sensitivity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Price, C.A.; Medici, V.; Nunez, M.V.; Lee, V.; Sigala, D.M.; Benyam, Y.; Keim, N.L.; Mason, A.E.; Chen, S.-Y.; Parenti, M.; Slupsky, C.; Epel, E.S.; Havel, P.J.; Stanhope, K.L. A Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Consuming 100% Orange Juice or Sucrose-Sweetened Beverage on Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Disease in Women. Nutrients 2021, 13, 760. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030760

AMA Style

Price CA, Medici V, Nunez MV, Lee V, Sigala DM, Benyam Y, Keim NL, Mason AE, Chen S-Y, Parenti M, Slupsky C, Epel ES, Havel PJ, Stanhope KL. A Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Consuming 100% Orange Juice or Sucrose-Sweetened Beverage on Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Disease in Women. Nutrients. 2021; 13(3):760. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030760

Chicago/Turabian Style

Price, Candice A.; Medici, Valentina; Nunez, Marinelle V.; Lee, Vivien; Sigala, Desiree M.; Benyam, Yanet; Keim, Nancy L.; Mason, Ashley E.; Chen, Shin-Yu; Parenti, Mariana; Slupsky, Carolyn; Epel, Elissa S.; Havel, Peter J.; Stanhope, Kimber L. 2021. "A Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Consuming 100% Orange Juice or Sucrose-Sweetened Beverage on Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Disease in Women" Nutrients 13, no. 3: 760. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030760

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