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Article

Greater Loss of Central Adiposity from Low-Carbohydrate versus Low-Fat Diet in Middle-Aged Adults with Overweight and Obesity

1
Department of Nutrition Sciences, School of Health Professions, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 University Blvd, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
2
Division of Preventive Medicine, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Medical Towers 621, 1717 11th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Katerina Vafeiadou
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020475
Received: 23 November 2020 / Revised: 18 January 2021 / Accepted: 25 January 2021 / Published: 31 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fat and Human Health Outcomes)
The objective of this study is to determine whether middle-aged adults prescribed a low carbohydrate-high fat (LCHF) or low fat (LF) diet would have greater loss of central fat and to determine whether the insulin resistance (IR) affects intervention response. A total of 50 participants (52.3 ± 10.7 years old; 36.6 ± 7.4 kg/m2 BMI; 82% female) were prescribed either a LCHF diet (n = 32, carbohydrate: protein: fat of 5%:30%:65% without calorie restriction), or LF diet (n = 18, 63%:13–23%: 10–25% with calorie restriction of total energy expenditure—500 kcal) for 15 weeks. Central and regional body composition changes from dual-x-ray absorptiometry and serum measures were compared using paired t-tests and ANCOVA with paired contrasts. IR was defined as homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) > 2.6. Compared to the LF group, the LCHF group lost more android (15.6 ± 11.2% vs. 8.3 ± 8.1%, p < 0.01) and visceral fat (18.5 ± 22.2% vs. 5.1 ± 15.8%, p < 0.05). Those with IR lost more android and visceral fat on the LCHF verses LF group (p < 0.05). Therefore, the clinical prescription to a LCHF diet may be an optimal strategy to reduce disease risk in middle-aged adults, particularly those with IR. View Full-Text
Keywords: weight loss; low-carbohydrate diet; insulin resistance; visceral fat; DXA weight loss; low-carbohydrate diet; insulin resistance; visceral fat; DXA
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MDPI and ACS Style

Garr Barry, V.; Stewart, M.; Soleymani, T.; Desmond, R.A.; Goss, A.M.; Gower, B.A. Greater Loss of Central Adiposity from Low-Carbohydrate versus Low-Fat Diet in Middle-Aged Adults with Overweight and Obesity. Nutrients 2021, 13, 475. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020475

AMA Style

Garr Barry V, Stewart M, Soleymani T, Desmond RA, Goss AM, Gower BA. Greater Loss of Central Adiposity from Low-Carbohydrate versus Low-Fat Diet in Middle-Aged Adults with Overweight and Obesity. Nutrients. 2021; 13(2):475. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020475

Chicago/Turabian Style

Garr Barry, Valene, Mariah Stewart, Taraneh Soleymani, Renee A. Desmond, Amy M. Goss, and Barbara A. Gower 2021. "Greater Loss of Central Adiposity from Low-Carbohydrate versus Low-Fat Diet in Middle-Aged Adults with Overweight and Obesity" Nutrients 13, no. 2: 475. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020475

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