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Article

Screening Practices for Disordered Eating in Paediatric Type 1 Diabetes Clinics

1
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Hunter New England Mental Health Service, Waratah, NSW 2298, Australia
3
School of Information and Physical Sciences/Data Science and Statistics, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia
5
John Hunter Children’s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Newcastle, NSW 2303, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Gun Forsander and Andriani Vazeou
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4187; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114187
Received: 13 October 2021 / Revised: 18 November 2021 / Accepted: 19 November 2021 / Published: 22 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Managing in Pediatric Diabetes: Aspects and Challenges)
Background: Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is associated with increased risk of eating disorders. This study aimed to (1) assess adherence of Australasian paediatric T1D clinics to international guidelines on screening for disordered eating and (2) identify barriers and enablers to the use of screening tools for the identification of disordered eating. Methods: A 24-item survey covering five content domains: clinic characteristics, identification of disordered eating, screening tool use, training and competence, and pathways for referral, was sent to Australasian clinics caring for ≥150 children and adolescents with T1D. Results: Of 13 eligible clinics, 10 participated. Two reported rates of disordered eating of >20%, while eight reported rates < 5%. All clinics used the routine clinical interview as the primary method of screening for disordered eating. Only one used screening tools; these were not diabetes-specific or routinely used. Barriers to use of screening tools included shortage of time and lack of staff confidence around use (n = 7, 70%). Enablers included staff training in disordered eating. Conclusions: Screening tools for disordered eating are not utilised by most Australasian paediatric T1D clinics. Overall, low reported rates of disordered eating suggest that it may be undetected, potentially missing an opportunity for early intervention. View Full-Text
Keywords: type 1 diabetes mellitus; feeding and eating disorders; early intervention; adolescents; Pediatrics; screening type 1 diabetes mellitus; feeding and eating disorders; early intervention; adolescents; Pediatrics; screening
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hanley Burden, E.; Hart, M.; Pursey, K.; Howley, P.P.; Smith, T.A.; Smart, C.E. Screening Practices for Disordered Eating in Paediatric Type 1 Diabetes Clinics. Nutrients 2021, 13, 4187. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114187

AMA Style

Hanley Burden E, Hart M, Pursey K, Howley PP, Smith TA, Smart CE. Screening Practices for Disordered Eating in Paediatric Type 1 Diabetes Clinics. Nutrients. 2021; 13(11):4187. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114187

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hanley Burden, Emma, Melissa Hart, Kirrilly Pursey, Peter P. Howley, Tenele A. Smith, and Carmel E. Smart. 2021. "Screening Practices for Disordered Eating in Paediatric Type 1 Diabetes Clinics" Nutrients 13, no. 11: 4187. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114187

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