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Article

Local Value Chain Models of Healthy Food Access: A Qualitative Study of Two Approaches

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John Glenn College of Public Affairs, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics, College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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Community Food Initiatives, Athens, OH 45701, USA
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Rural Action, The Plains, OH 45780, USA
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School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Zumin Shi
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 4145; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114145
Received: 27 October 2021 / Revised: 12 November 2021 / Accepted: 17 November 2021 / Published: 19 November 2021
Food value chains are increasingly recognized as more equitable alternatives to traditional supply chains and may represent a novel mechanism to achieve health equity at the local level. Country Fresh Stops (CFS) and Donation Station (DS) are two complementary programs that are part of a more robust value chain designed to support local agriculture in Appalachia Ohio. As the first study of these programs in the peer-reviewed literature, the objectives were to identify factors that facilitate or hinder the implementation of these two local value chain models of healthy food access and to identify the perceived impacts from the perspective of the sites implementing them. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with CFS (n = 7) and DS (n = 10) site representatives in January 2020. Template analysis was used to identify themes through a priori and inductive codes. Participants identified two primary facilitators: support from partner organizations and on-site program stewardship. Produce (and program) seasonality and mitigating food waste were the most cited challenges. Despite challenges, both CFS and DS sites perceive the models to be successful efforts for supporting the local economy, achieving organizational missions, and providing consumers with greater access to locally grown produce. These innovative programs demonstrate good feasibility, but long-term sustainability and impacts on other key stakeholders merit further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: local food; food value chains; community food security; Appalachia; qualitative research local food; food value chains; community food security; Appalachia; qualitative research
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MDPI and ACS Style

Krzyzanowski Guerra, K.; Hanks, A.S.; Plakias, Z.T.; Huser, S.; Redfern, T.; Garner, J.A. Local Value Chain Models of Healthy Food Access: A Qualitative Study of Two Approaches. Nutrients 2021, 13, 4145. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114145

AMA Style

Krzyzanowski Guerra K, Hanks AS, Plakias ZT, Huser S, Redfern T, Garner JA. Local Value Chain Models of Healthy Food Access: A Qualitative Study of Two Approaches. Nutrients. 2021; 13(11):4145. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114145

Chicago/Turabian Style

Krzyzanowski Guerra, Kathleen, Andrew S. Hanks, Zoë T. Plakias, Susie Huser, Tom Redfern, and Jennifer A. Garner. 2021. "Local Value Chain Models of Healthy Food Access: A Qualitative Study of Two Approaches" Nutrients 13, no. 11: 4145. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13114145

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