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Article

Oral Nutritional Supplementation Improves Growth in Children at Malnutrition Risk and with Picky Eating Behaviors

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Abbott Nutrition, Research & Development India, 15th Floor, Godrej BKC Plot–C, “G” Block, Bandra Kurla Complex, Bandra East, Mumbai 400051, Maharashtra, India
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Statistical Services, Cognizant Technology Solutions India Private Limited, Manyata Business Park, Nagavara, Bengaluru 560045, Karnataka, India
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Ajanta Research Centre, Ajanta Hospital & IVF Centre, 765, ABC Complex, Kanpur Road, Alambagh, Lucknow 226005, Uttar Pradesh, India
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Institute of Child Health, Ground Floor, 11, Biresh Guha Street, Kolkata 700017, West Bengal, India
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Medipoint Hospital, S. No. 241/1, New D.P. Road, Aundh, Pune 411007, Maharashtra, India
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Jehangir Clinical Development Centre, Jehangir Hospital, 32, Sassoon Road, Near Pune Station, Pune 411001, Maharashtra, India
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Saint Theresa’s Hospital, Erragadda, Sanath Nagar, Hyderabad 500018, Telangana, India
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Praveen Cardiac Centre, Moghalrajpuram Madhu Garden bus stop, No. 5 Bus Route, Vijayawada 520010, Andhra Pradesh, India
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Noble Hospital Private Limited, 153, Magarpatta City Road, Hadapsar, Pune 411013, Maharashtra, India
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JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysuru 570004, Karnataka, India
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Pune Sterling Multispecialty Hospital, Sector 27, Near Bhel Chowk, Pradhikiran, Nigdi, Pune 411044, Maharashtra, India
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Sangini Hospital, Sangini Complex, Near Parimal Crossing, Ahmedabad 380006, Gujarat, India
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Abbott Nutrition Research and Development Asia-Pacific Center, Singapore 138668, Singapore
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Roberto Iacone
Nutrients 2021, 13(10), 3590; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103590
Received: 13 September 2021 / Revised: 5 October 2021 / Accepted: 10 October 2021 / Published: 14 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Pediatric Nutrition)
The problem of poor nutrition with impaired growth persists in young children worldwide, including in India, where wasting occurs in 20% of urban children (<5 years). Exacerbating this problem, some children are described by their parent as a picky eater with behaviors such as eating limited food and unwillingness to try new foods. Timely intervention can help prevent nutritional decline and promote growth recovery; oral nutritional supplements (ONS) and dietary counseling (DC) are commonly used. The present study aimed to determine the effects of ONS along with DC on growth in comparison with the effects of DC only. Enrolled children (N = 321) were >24 to ≤48 months old, at malnutrition risk (weight-for-height percentile 3rd to 15th), and described as a picky eater by their parent. Enrollees were randomized to one of the three groups (N = 107 per group): ONS1 + DC; ONS2 + DC; and DC only. From day 1 to day 90, study findings showed significant increases in weight-for-height percentile for ONS1 + DC and for ONS2 + DC interventions, as compared to DC only (p = 0.0086 for both). There was no significant difference between the two ONS groups. Anthropometric measurements (weight and body mass index) also increased significantly over time for the two ONS groups (versus DC only, p < 0.05), while ONS1 + DC significantly improved mid-upper-arm circumference (p < 0.05 versus DC only), as well. ONS groups showed a trend toward greater height gain when compared to DC only group, but the differences were not significant within the study interval. For young Indian children with nutritional risk and picky eating behaviors, our findings showed that a 90-day nutritional intervention with either ONS1 or ONS2, along with DC, promoted catch-up growth more effectively than did DC alone. View Full-Text
Keywords: children; growth; picky eating; malnutrition; oral nutritional supplements children; growth; picky eating; malnutrition; oral nutritional supplements
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MDPI and ACS Style

Khanna, D.; Yalawar, M.; Saibaba, P.V.; Bhatnagar, S.; Ghosh, A.; Jog, P.; Khadilkar, A.V.; Kishore, B.; Paruchuri, A.K.; Pote, P.D.; Mandyam, R.D.; Shinde, S.; Shah, A.; Huynh, D.T.T. Oral Nutritional Supplementation Improves Growth in Children at Malnutrition Risk and with Picky Eating Behaviors. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3590. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103590

AMA Style

Khanna D, Yalawar M, Saibaba PV, Bhatnagar S, Ghosh A, Jog P, Khadilkar AV, Kishore B, Paruchuri AK, Pote PD, Mandyam RD, Shinde S, Shah A, Huynh DTT. Oral Nutritional Supplementation Improves Growth in Children at Malnutrition Risk and with Picky Eating Behaviors. Nutrients. 2021; 13(10):3590. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103590

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khanna, Deepti, Menaka Yalawar, Pinupa V. Saibaba, Shirish Bhatnagar, Apurba Ghosh, Pramod Jog, Anuradha V. Khadilkar, Bala Kishore, Anil K. Paruchuri, Prahalad D. Pote, Ravi D. Mandyam, Sandeep Shinde, Atish Shah, and Dieu T.T. Huynh 2021. "Oral Nutritional Supplementation Improves Growth in Children at Malnutrition Risk and with Picky Eating Behaviors" Nutrients 13, no. 10: 3590. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103590

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