Next Article in Journal
Are Nutrition Standards for Beverages in Schools Associated with Healthier Beverage Intakes among Adolescents in the US?
Next Article in Special Issue
Actigraphy-Derived Sleep Is Associated with Eating Behavior Characteristics
Previous Article in Journal
Managing the Microbiome: How the Gut Influences Development and Disease
Previous Article in Special Issue
Habitual Nightly Fasting Duration, Eating Timing, and Eating Frequency are Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk in Women
Open AccessArticle

Later Meal and Sleep Timing Predicts Higher Percent Body Fat

1
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
2
Anschutz Health & Wellness Center, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
3
Rocky Mountain Regional Veterans Administration Medical Center, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
4
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
5
Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
6
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010073
Received: 17 November 2020 / Revised: 12 December 2020 / Accepted: 18 December 2020 / Published: 29 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Dietary Patterns and Sleep on Body Weight Management)
Accumulating evidence suggests that later timing of energy intake (EI) is associated with increased risk of obesity. In this study, 83 individuals with overweight and obesity underwent assessment of a 7-day period of data collection, including measures of body weight and body composition (DXA) and 24-h measures of EI (photographic food records), sleep (actigraphy), and physical activity (PA, activity monitors) for 7 days. Relationships between body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat (DXA) with meal timing, sleep, and PA were examined. For every 1 h later start of eating, there was a 1.25 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.91) unit increase in percent body fat (False Discovery Rate (FDR) adjusted p value = 0.010). For every 1 h later midpoint of the eating window, there was a 1.35 (95% CI: 0.51, 2.19) unit increase in percent body fat (FDR p value = 0.029). For every 1 h increase in the end of the sleep period, there was a 1.64 (95% CI: 0.56, 2.72) unit increase in percent body fat (FDR p value = 0.044). Later meal and sleep timing were also associated with lower PA levels. In summary, later timing of EI and sleep are associated with higher body fat and lower levels of PA in people with overweight and obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: meal timing; sleep timing; time-restricted eating meal timing; sleep timing; time-restricted eating
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Thomas, E.A.; Zaman, A.; Cornier, M.-A.; Catenacci, V.A.; Tussey, E.J.; Grau, L.; Arbet, J.; Broussard, J.L.; Rynders, C.A. Later Meal and Sleep Timing Predicts Higher Percent Body Fat. Nutrients 2021, 13, 73. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010073

AMA Style

Thomas EA, Zaman A, Cornier M-A, Catenacci VA, Tussey EJ, Grau L, Arbet J, Broussard JL, Rynders CA. Later Meal and Sleep Timing Predicts Higher Percent Body Fat. Nutrients. 2021; 13(1):73. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010073

Chicago/Turabian Style

Thomas, Elizabeth A.; Zaman, Adnin; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Catenacci, Victoria A.; Tussey, Emma J.; Grau, Laura; Arbet, Jaron; Broussard, Josiane L.; Rynders, Corey A. 2021. "Later Meal and Sleep Timing Predicts Higher Percent Body Fat" Nutrients 13, no. 1: 73. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010073

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop