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Open AccessArticle

Oxidative Stress in Rats is Modulated by Seasonal Consumption of Sweet Cherries from Different Geographical Origins: Local vs. Non-Local

Nutrigenomics Research Group, Departament de Bioquímica i Biotecnologia, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona, Spain
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Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2854; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092854
Received: 12 August 2020 / Revised: 15 September 2020 / Accepted: 17 September 2020 / Published: 18 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Biomarkers in Human Nutrition)
Sweet cherries (Prunus avium L.) are a source of bioactive compounds, including phenolic compounds, which are antioxidants that contribute to protection against oxidative stress. It is known that the composition of cherries is influenced by external conditions, such as the geographic origin of cultivation, and that biological rhythms have a significant effect on oxidative stress. Therefore, in this study, Fischer 344 rats were exposed to various photoperiods and were supplemented with Brooks sweet cherries from two different geographical origins, local (LC) and non-local (NLC), to evaluate the interaction of supplementation and biological rhythms with regard to the oxidative stress status. The results indicate that the two fruits generated specific effects and that these effects were modulated by the photoperiod. Consumption of sweet cherries in-season, independently of their origin, may promote health by preventing oxidative stress, tending to: enhance antioxidant status, decrease alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, reduce liver malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and maintain constant serum MDA values and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. View Full-Text
Keywords: cherries; polyphenols; antioxidant; phenolic signature; photoperiod; rhythms; seasons cherries; polyphenols; antioxidant; phenolic signature; photoperiod; rhythms; seasons
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Cruz-Carrión, Á.; Ruiz de Azua, M.J.; Mulero, M.; Arola-Arnal, A.; Suárez, M. Oxidative Stress in Rats is Modulated by Seasonal Consumption of Sweet Cherries from Different Geographical Origins: Local vs. Non-Local. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2854.

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