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Article

Do the Dietary Intakes of Pregnant Women Attending Public Hospital Antenatal Clinics Align with Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Recommendations?

1
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
3
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Lot 1, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia
4
Department of Rural Health, The University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW 2340, Australia
5
Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviours, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2438; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082438
Received: 20 July 2020 / Revised: 9 August 2020 / Accepted: 11 August 2020 / Published: 13 August 2020
The maternal diet influences the long-term health status of both mother and offspring. The current study aimed to compare dietary intakes of pregnant women compared to food and nutrient recommendations in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) and Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs). Usual dietary intake was assessed in a sample of women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy attending antenatal outpatient clinics at John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (NSW). Dietary intake was measured using the Australian Eating Survey, a validated, semi-quantitative 120-item food frequency questionnaire. Daily food group servings and nutrient intakes were compared to AGHE and NRV targets. Of 534 women participating, none met the AGHE recommendations for all food groups. Highest adherence was for fruit serves (38%), and lowest for breads and cereals (0.6%). Only four women met the pregnancy NRVs for folate, iron, calcium, zinc and fibre from food alone. Current dietary intakes of Australian women during pregnancy do not align with national nutrition guidelines. This highlights the importance of routine vitamin and mineral supplementation during pregnancy, as intakes from diet alone may commonly be inadequate. Future revisions of dietary guidelines and pregnancy nutrition recommendations should consider current dietary patterns. Pregnant women currently need more support to optimise food and nutrient intakes. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; nutrition; dietary intake; dietary guidelines; food-based guidelines pregnancy; nutrition; dietary intake; dietary guidelines; food-based guidelines
MDPI and ACS Style

Slater, K.; Rollo, M.E.; Szewczyk, Z.; Ashton, L.; Schumacher, T.; Collins, C. Do the Dietary Intakes of Pregnant Women Attending Public Hospital Antenatal Clinics Align with Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Recommendations? Nutrients 2020, 12, 2438. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082438

AMA Style

Slater K, Rollo ME, Szewczyk Z, Ashton L, Schumacher T, Collins C. Do the Dietary Intakes of Pregnant Women Attending Public Hospital Antenatal Clinics Align with Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Recommendations? Nutrients. 2020; 12(8):2438. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082438

Chicago/Turabian Style

Slater, Kaylee, Megan E. Rollo, Zoe Szewczyk, Lee Ashton, Tracy Schumacher, and Clare Collins. 2020. "Do the Dietary Intakes of Pregnant Women Attending Public Hospital Antenatal Clinics Align with Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Recommendations?" Nutrients 12, no. 8: 2438. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082438

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