Next Article in Journal
Gamma-Polyglutamic Acid-Rich Natto Suppresses Postprandial Blood Glucose Response in the Early Phase after Meals: A Randomized Crossover Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Towards Win–Win Policies for Healthy and Sustainable Diets in Switzerland
Previous Article in Journal
Heart Rate Variability Behavior during Exercise and Short-Term Recovery Following Energy Drink Consumption in Men and Women
Previous Article in Special Issue
Development of Criteria for a Positive Front-of-Package Food Labeling: The Israeli Case
Article

Addressing Challenges with the Categorization of Foods Processed at Home: A Pilot Methodology to Inform Consumer-Facing Guidance

1
Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA
2
Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2373; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082373
Received: 14 July 2020 / Revised: 3 August 2020 / Accepted: 5 August 2020 / Published: 8 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Policies and Diet)
The objective of this study was to inform consumer-facing dietary guidance by (1) adapting the current University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) food processing framework to include a home processing (HP) component and (2) pilot testing the adapted version using a nationally representative sample of foods consumed in the U.S. The UNC framework was adapted to include guidelines for categorizing home-prepared (HP) foods. The original UNC and adapted HP frameworks were used to code dietary recalls from a random sample of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2015–2016 cycle) participants (n = 100; ages 2–80 years). Percent changes between the UNC and HP adapted frameworks for each processing category were calculated using Microsoft Excel, version 16.23. Participants were 56% female, 35% non-Hispanic white (mean age = 31.3 ± 23.8). There were 1,376 foods with 651 unique foods reported. Using the HP compared to the UNC framework, unprocessed/minimally processed foods declined by 11.7% (UNC: 31.0% vs. HP: 27.4%); basic processed foods increased by 116.8% (UNC: 8.2% vs. HP: 17.8%); moderately processed foods increased by 16.3% (UNC: 14.2% vs. HP: 16.6%); and highly processed foods decreased by 17.8% (UNC: 46.5% vs. HP: 38.2%). Home-prepared foods should be considered as distinct from industrially produced foods when coding dietary data by processing category. This has implications for consumer-facing dietary guidance that incorporates processing level as an indicator of diet quality. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary guidance; food processing; food classification systems; processing; ultra-processed; NOVA; home cooking; homemade foods; home-prepared foods dietary guidance; food processing; food classification systems; processing; ultra-processed; NOVA; home cooking; homemade foods; home-prepared foods
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bleiweiss-Sande, R.; Bailey, C.P.; Sacheck, J.; Goldberg, J.P. Addressing Challenges with the Categorization of Foods Processed at Home: A Pilot Methodology to Inform Consumer-Facing Guidance. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2373. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082373

AMA Style

Bleiweiss-Sande R, Bailey CP, Sacheck J, Goldberg JP. Addressing Challenges with the Categorization of Foods Processed at Home: A Pilot Methodology to Inform Consumer-Facing Guidance. Nutrients. 2020; 12(8):2373. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082373

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bleiweiss-Sande, Rachel; Bailey, Caitlin P.; Sacheck, Jennifer; Goldberg, Jeanne P. 2020. "Addressing Challenges with the Categorization of Foods Processed at Home: A Pilot Methodology to Inform Consumer-Facing Guidance" Nutrients 12, no. 8: 2373. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082373

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop