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Open AccessArticle

Nutritional Status and Quality of Life in Hospitalised Cancer Patients Who Develop Intestinal Failure and Require Parenteral Nutrition: An Observational Study

1
Intestinal Failure Service, Department of Gastroenterology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London NW1 2BU, UK
2
Division of Medicine, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2357; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082357
Received: 29 April 2020 / Revised: 30 July 2020 / Accepted: 5 August 2020 / Published: 7 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intestinal Failure and Home Parenteral Nutrition)
(1) Background: Malnutrition in cancer patients impacts quality of life (QoL) and performance status (PS). When oral/enteral nutrition is not possible and patients develop intestinal failure, parenteral nutrition (PN) is indicated. Our aim was to assess nutritional status, QoL, and PS in hospitalised cancer patients recently initiated on PN for intestinal failure. (2) Methods: The design was a cross-sectional observational study. The following information was captured: demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and medical information, as well as nutritional screening tool (NST), patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA), functional assessment of cancer therapy-general (FACT-G), and Karnofsky PS (KPS) data. (3) Results: Among 85 PN referrals, 30 oncology patients (56.2 years, 56.7% male) were identified. Mean weight (60.3 ± 16.6 kg) corresponded to normal body mass index values (21.0 ± 5.1 kg/m2). However, weight loss was significant in patients with gastrointestinal tumours (p < 0.01). A high malnutrition risk was present in 53.3–56.7% of patients, depending on the screening tool. Patients had impaired QoL (FACT-G: 26.6 ± 9.8) but PS indicated above average capability with independent daily activities (KPS: 60 ± 10). (4) Conclusions: Future research should assess the impact of impaired NS and QoL on clinical outcomes such as survival, with a view to encompassing nutritional and QoL assessment in the management pathway of this patient group. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition; quality of life; advanced cancer; oncology; parenteral nutrition nutrition; quality of life; advanced cancer; oncology; parenteral nutrition
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Plyta, M.; Patel, P.S.; Fragkos, K.C.; Kumagai, T.; Mehta, S.; Rahman, F.; Di Caro, S. Nutritional Status and Quality of Life in Hospitalised Cancer Patients Who Develop Intestinal Failure and Require Parenteral Nutrition: An Observational Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2357.

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