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Open AccessArticle

What Healthcare Professionals Think of “Nutrition & Diet” Apps: An International Survey

1
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Murtenstrasse 50, 3008 Bern, Switzerland
2
Institute Gustave Roussy, Inserm Unit, U981 Paris, France
3
Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, Nutritional Medicine and Metabolism, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2214; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082214
Received: 12 June 2020 / Revised: 13 July 2020 / Accepted: 21 July 2020 / Published: 24 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Assessment in Human Health and Disease)
Accurate dietary assessment is crucial for both the prevention and treatment of nutrition-related diseases. Since mobile-based dietary assessment solutions are promising, we sought to examine the acceptability of “Nutrition and Diet” (ND) apps by Healthcare Professionals (HCP), explore their preferences on apps’ features and identify predictors of acceptance. A 23 question survey was developed by an interdisciplinary team and pilot-tested. The survey was completed by 1001 HCP from 73 countries and 6 continents. The HCP (dietitians: 833, doctors: 75, nurses: 62, other: 31/females: 847, males: 150, neither: 4) had a mean age (SD) of 34.4 (10.2) years and mean job experience in years (SD): 7.7 (8.2). There were 45.5% who have recommended ND apps to their clients/patients. Of those who have not yet recommended an app, 22.5% do not know of their existence. Important criteria for selecting an app were ease of use (87.1%), apps being free of charge (72.6%) and validated (69%). Significant barriers were the use of inaccurate food composition database (52%), lack of local food composition database support (48.2%) and tech-savviness (43.3%). Although the adoption of smartphones is growing and mobile health research is advancing, there is room for improvement in the recommendation of ND apps by HCP. View Full-Text
Keywords: mHealth; mobile applications; smartphone; dietary assessment; survey; healthcare professionals mHealth; mobile applications; smartphone; dietary assessment; survey; healthcare professionals
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Vasiloglou, M.F.; Christodoulidis, S.; Reber, E.; Stathopoulou, T.; Lu, Y.; Stanga, Z.; Mougiakakou, S. What Healthcare Professionals Think of “Nutrition & Diet” Apps: An International Survey. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2214.

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