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Article

Effects of Creatine Supplementation during Resistance Training Sessions in Physically Active Young Adults

1
Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S0A2, Canada
2
Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, Brandon University, Brandon, MB R7A6A9, Canada
3
Institute of Sports Sciences & Medicine, Department of Nutrition, Food, & Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32313, USA
4
Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4041 Durban, South Africa
5
Department of Health and Human Performance, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, FL 33314, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1880; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061880
Received: 20 May 2020 / Revised: 5 June 2020 / Accepted: 22 June 2020 / Published: 24 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Human Health, Performance and Recovery)
The purpose was to examine the effects of creatine supplementation during resistance training sessions on skeletal muscle mass and exercise performance in physically active young adults. Twenty-two participants were randomized to supplement with creatine (CR: n = 13, 26 ± 4 yrs; 0.0055 g·kg−1 post training set) or placebo (PLA: n = 9, 26 ± 5 yrs; 0.0055 g·kg−1 post training set) during six weeks of resistance training (18 sets per training session; five days per week). Prior to and following training and supplementation, measurements were made for muscle thickness (elbow and knee flexors/extensors, ankle plantarflexors), power (vertical jump and medicine ball throw), strength (leg press and chest press one-repetition maximum (1-RM)) and muscular endurance (one set of repetitions to volitional fatigue using 50% baseline 1-RM for leg press and chest press). The creatine group experienced a significant increase (p < 0.05) in leg press, chest press and total body strength and leg press endurance with no significant changes in the PLA group. Both groups improved total body endurance over time (p < 0.05), with greater gains observed in the creatine group. In conclusion, creatine ingestion during resistance training sessions is a viable strategy for improving muscle strength and some indices of muscle endurance in physically active young adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: intra-workout; muscle mass; strength; endurance; power intra-workout; muscle mass; strength; endurance; power
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mills, S.; Candow, D.G.; Forbes, S.C.; Neary, J.P.; Ormsbee, M.J.; Antonio, J. Effects of Creatine Supplementation during Resistance Training Sessions in Physically Active Young Adults. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1880. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061880

AMA Style

Mills S, Candow DG, Forbes SC, Neary JP, Ormsbee MJ, Antonio J. Effects of Creatine Supplementation during Resistance Training Sessions in Physically Active Young Adults. Nutrients. 2020; 12(6):1880. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061880

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mills, Scotty, Darren G. Candow, Scott C. Forbes, J. P. Neary, Michael J. Ormsbee, and Jose Antonio. 2020. "Effects of Creatine Supplementation during Resistance Training Sessions in Physically Active Young Adults" Nutrients 12, no. 6: 1880. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061880

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