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Open AccessArticle

Contribution of 100% Fruit Juice to Micronutrient Intakes in the United States, United Kingdom and Brazil

1
Nutrition Sciences, PepsiCo R&D, Purchase, New York, NY 10577, USA
2
Intertek Health Sciences Inc., Mississauga, ON L5N 2X7, Canada
3
Data Science and Analytics, PepsiCo R&D, Barrington, IL 60010, USA
4
Sig-Nurture Ltd., Guildford, Surrey GU1 2TF, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1258; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051258
Received: 23 March 2020 / Revised: 21 April 2020 / Accepted: 23 April 2020 / Published: 28 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Epidemiology)
The contribution of 100% fruit juice (FJ) to the total daily intakes of energy, sugars, and select vitamins and minerals and to the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) or adequate intake (AI) of these micronutrients was assessed in individuals reporting the consumption of 100% FJ in the national dietary intake surveys of the United States (U.S.; n = 8661), the United Kingdom (UK; n = 2546) and Brazil (n = 34,003). Associations of 100% FJ intake with the odds of being overweight or obese also were assessed. Data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2013–2014), the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2012–2014), and Brazil’s Pesquisa de Orçamentos Familiares (2008–2009) were used, and all analyses were limited to individuals reporting consumption of 100% FJ on at least one day of the dietary intake survey. Approximately 34%, 37%, and 42% of individuals surveyed reported the consumption of 100% FJ on at least one day of the dietary intake survey in the U.S., UK, and Brazil, respectively, and the average daily intakes of 100% FJ were 184 g, 130 g, and 249 g, respectively. Across the 3 countries, 100% FJ contributed to 3–6% of total energy intakes, 12–31% of total sugar intakes, 21–54% of total vitamin C intakes, 1–12% of total vitamin A intakes, 4–15% of total folate intakes, 7–17% of total potassium intakes, 2–7% of total calcium intakes, and 4–12% of total magnesium intakes. In a multivariate logistic regression model, juice intake was associated with a significant reduction in the odds of being overweight or obese in UK adults (OR = 0.79; 0.63, 0.99), and significant increases in the odds of being overweight or obese in UK children (OR = 1.16; 1.01, 1.33) and Brazilian adults (OR = 1.04; 1.00, 1.09). Nutrient contributions of 100% FJ vary according to regional intake levels. In all three countries studied, 100% FJ contributed to more than 5% of the RDAs for vitamin C and folate. In the U.S. and Brazil, 100% FJ contributed to more than 5% of the RDA for magnesium and more than 5% of the AI for potassium. View Full-Text
Keywords: juice; dietary modeling; nutrients; dietary survey; Pesquisa de Orçamentos Familiares; National Diet and Nutrition Survey; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey juice; dietary modeling; nutrients; dietary survey; Pesquisa de Orçamentos Familiares; National Diet and Nutrition Survey; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
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Mitchell, E.S.; Musa-Veloso, K.; Fallah, S.; Lee, H.Y.; Chavez, P.J.D.; Gibson, S. Contribution of 100% Fruit Juice to Micronutrient Intakes in the United States, United Kingdom and Brazil. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1258.

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