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Article

Legume Consumption Patterns in US Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–2014 and Beans, Lentils, Peas (BLP) 2017 Survey

1
College of Public Health and Human Sciences, School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1237; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051237
Received: 4 April 2020 / Revised: 17 April 2020 / Accepted: 24 April 2020 / Published: 27 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Policies and Education for Health Promotion)
Given the emerging health benefits of regular legume consumption, we hypothesized that the historically low legume consumption levels in US adults increased. We evaluated legume consumption patterns in US adults using cross-sectional data from the 2011–2012 and 2013–2014-year cycles of National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) and a 2017 cross-sectional, online survey of Oregon families named “Beans, Lentils, Peas (BLP) Survey”. We also compared legume consumption patterns between consumers below US dietary recommendations for mature legumes (<37.5 g/day, marginal), below levels showing nutritional and disease-prevention benefits (37.5–87.49 g/day, recommended); and levels demonstrating nutritional and disease prevention benefits (≥87.5 g/day; beneficial). In NHANES, legume consumption remained low in US adults and declined from 2011 to 2014 (mature legumes: 12.8 to 8.3%; dry beans: 10.0 to 6.5%). In BLP, less than 5% consumed legumes daily; approximately one-third did not consume legumes during the last month. Marginal mature-legume consumers ate a limited variety of legumes (dry beans and green legumes on a weekly to monthly basis). Beneficial amount consumers ate mature legumes daily or every other day and included chickpeas, lentils and dry peas to their legume mix. Our data suggest that legume consumption declined in US adults, warranting improved communication about the benefits of regular legume consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: legumes; cross-sectional survey; NHANES legumes; cross-sectional survey; NHANES
MDPI and ACS Style

Perera, T.; Russo, C.; Takata, Y.; Bobe, G. Legume Consumption Patterns in US Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–2014 and Beans, Lentils, Peas (BLP) 2017 Survey. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1237. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051237

AMA Style

Perera T, Russo C, Takata Y, Bobe G. Legume Consumption Patterns in US Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–2014 and Beans, Lentils, Peas (BLP) 2017 Survey. Nutrients. 2020; 12(5):1237. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051237

Chicago/Turabian Style

Perera, Thushanthi, Candace Russo, Yumie Takata, and Gerd Bobe. 2020. "Legume Consumption Patterns in US Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–2014 and Beans, Lentils, Peas (BLP) 2017 Survey" Nutrients 12, no. 5: 1237. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051237

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