Next Article in Journal
Schisandra Extract and Ascorbic Acid Synergistically Enhance Cognition in Mice Through Modulation of Mitochondrial Respiration
Previous Article in Journal
Consumer Acceptance of Biscuits Supplemented with a Sorghum–Insect Meal
Previous Article in Special Issue
Triterpene Acids of Loquat Leaf Improve Inflammation in Cigarette Smoking Induced COPD by Regulating AMPK/Nrf2 and NFκB Pathways
Open AccessArticle

Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Function Restoration in Mice by Maize Diet Containing Enriched Flavan-4-Ols

1
Department of Plant Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
2
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Plant Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
3
Department of Food Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
4
Department of Food Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
5
Department of Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
6
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
7
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors contributed equally.
Current address: Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 896; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040896 (registering DOI)
Received: 13 February 2020 / Revised: 10 March 2020 / Accepted: 17 March 2020 / Published: 25 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Benefits of Dietary Phytochemicals)
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition, awaits safe and effective preventive strategies. Naturally occurring flavonoid compounds are promising therapeutic candidates against IBD due to their great antioxidant potential and ability to reduce inflammation and improve immune signaling mediators in the gut. In this study, we utilized two maize near-isogenic lines flavan-4-ols-containing P1-rr (F+) and flavan-4-ols-lacking p1-ww (F−) to investigate the anti-inflammatory property of flavan-4-ols against carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)-induced low-grade colonic inflammation. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either 1% CMC (w/v) or water for a total of 15 weeks. After week six, mice on CMC treatment were divided into four groups. One group continued on the control diet. The second and third groups were supplemented with F+ at 15% or 25% (w/w). The fourth group received diet supplemented with F− at 15%. Here we report that mice consuming F+(15) and F+(25) alleviated CMC-induced increase in epididymal fat-pad, colon histology score, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 expression and intestinal permeability compared to mice fed with control diet and F−(15). F+(15) and F+(25) significantly enhanced mucus thickness in CMC exposed mice (p < 0.05). These data collectively demonstrated the protective effect of flavan-4-ol against colonic inflammation by restoring intestinal barrier function and provide a rationale to breed for flavan-4-ols enriched cultivars for better dietary benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: maize; flavonoid; flavan-4-ol; carboxymethylcellulose; colonic inflammation maize; flavonoid; flavan-4-ol; carboxymethylcellulose; colonic inflammation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Wu, B.; Bhatnagar, R.; Indukuri, V.V.; Chopra, S.; March, K.; Cordero, N.; Chopra, S.; Reddivari, L. Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Function Restoration in Mice by Maize Diet Containing Enriched Flavan-4-Ols. Nutrients 2020, 12, 896.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop