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Article

Nutrient Extraction Lowers Postprandial Glucose Response of Fruit in Adults with Obesity as well as Healthy Weight Adults

School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK
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Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030766
Received: 14 February 2020 / Revised: 9 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 14 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Persuading the Population to Eat a Healthier Diet)
Fruit consumption is recommended as part of a healthy diet. However, consumption of fruit in the form of juice is positively associated with type 2 diabetes risk, possibly due to resulting hyperglycemia. In a recent study, fruit juice prepared by nutrient extraction, a process that retains the fiber component, was shown to elicit a favorable glycemic index (GI), compared to eating the fruit whole, in healthy weight adults. The current study expanded on this to include individuals with obesity, and assessed whether the nutrient extraction of seeded fruits reduced GI in a higher disease risk group. Nutrient extraction was shown to significantly lower GI, compared to eating fruit whole, in subjects with obesity (raspberry/mango: 25.43 ± 18.20 vs. 44.85 ± 20.18, p = 0.034 and passion fruit/mango (26.30 ± 25.72 vs. 42.56 ± 20.64, p = 0.044). Similar results were found in those of a healthy weight. In summary, the current study indicates that the nutrient-extraction of raspberries and passionfruit mixed with mango lowers the GI, not only in healthy weight individuals, but also in those with obesity, and supports further investigation into the potential for nutrient extraction to enable increased fruit intake without causing a high glycemic response. View Full-Text
Keywords: glycemic index; obesity; raspberry; passionfruit; postprandial glycemic index; obesity; raspberry; passionfruit; postprandial
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alkutbe, R.; Redfern, K.; Jarvis, M.; Rees, G. Nutrient Extraction Lowers Postprandial Glucose Response of Fruit in Adults with Obesity as well as Healthy Weight Adults. Nutrients 2020, 12, 766. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030766

AMA Style

Alkutbe R, Redfern K, Jarvis M, Rees G. Nutrient Extraction Lowers Postprandial Glucose Response of Fruit in Adults with Obesity as well as Healthy Weight Adults. Nutrients. 2020; 12(3):766. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030766

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alkutbe, Rabab, Kathy Redfern, Michael Jarvis, and Gail Rees. 2020. "Nutrient Extraction Lowers Postprandial Glucose Response of Fruit in Adults with Obesity as well as Healthy Weight Adults" Nutrients 12, no. 3: 766. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030766

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