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Impact of Vitamin D on Physical Efficiency and Exercise Performance—A Review
Open AccessArticle

Acute Responses to Low and High Intensity Exercise in Type 1 Diabetic Adolescents in Relation to Their Level of Serum 25(OH)D

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Department of Physiology, Gdansk University of Physical Education and Sport, 80-336 Gdansk, Poland
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Department of Pediatrics, Diabetology and Endocrinology, Gdansk Medical University, 80-210 Gdansk, Poland
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Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland
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Medbase St. Gallen Am Vadianplatz, 9001 St. Gallen, Switzerland
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Exercise Physiology Laboratory, 18450 Nikaia, Greece
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Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Murcia, 30003 Murcia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020454
Received: 21 December 2019 / Revised: 28 January 2020 / Accepted: 4 February 2020 / Published: 11 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin D and Sport Performance)
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in glycaemic reaction in response to various physical activities in 20 young boys (14.4 ± 1.6 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and with either vitamin D deficiency or with suboptimal levels of vitamin D. Participants were divided into two groups (deficiency group—DG, n = 10; suboptimal group—SG, n = 10) according to their vitamin D levels. All patients performed aerobic and mixed (aerobic-anaerobic) physical efforts. During the exercise, the respiratory responses and glucose levels were monitored. Biochemical blood analyses were performed before each physical effort. The oxygen consumption was not significantly lower in SG during both aerobic and mixed effort (4.0% and 5.6%, respectively). The glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level was higher by 6.1% and the total daily dose of insulin (DDI) was higher by 18.4% in the DG. The differences were not statistically significant. Patients with lower vitamin D levels demonstrated an insignificantly higher glycaemic variability during days with both aerobic and mixed exercises. An appropriate vitamin D concentration in T1DM patients’ blood may constitute a prophylactic factor for hyperglycaemia during anaerobic training and hypoglycaemia during aerobic training. View Full-Text
Keywords: type 1 diabetes; serum 25(OH)D; oxygen consumption; blood glucose; exercise intensity type 1 diabetes; serum 25(OH)D; oxygen consumption; blood glucose; exercise intensity
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Myśliwec, A.; Skalska, M.; Knechtle, B.; Nikolaidis, P.T.; Rosemann, T.; Szmigiero-Kawko, M.; Lejk, A.; Jastrzębska, J.; Radzimiński, Ł.; Wakuluk, D.; Czapiewska, K.; López-Sánchez, G.F.; Jastrzębski, Z. Acute Responses to Low and High Intensity Exercise in Type 1 Diabetic Adolescents in Relation to Their Level of Serum 25(OH)D. Nutrients 2020, 12, 454.

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