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Article

Combined Soluble Fiber-Mediated Intestinal Microbiota Improve Insulin Sensitivity of Obese Mice

1
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
2
Department of Animal Genetics and Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
3
The Cooperative Innovation Centre for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020351
Received: 12 December 2019 / Revised: 15 January 2020 / Accepted: 20 January 2020 / Published: 29 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Link between Diet, Gut Microbes and Health)
Dietary fiber, an important regulator of intestinal microbiota, is a promising tool for preventing obesity and related metabolic disorders. However, the functional links between dietary fiber, intestinal microbiota, and obesity phenotype are still not fully understood. Combined soluble fiber (CSF) is a synthetic mixture of polysaccharides and displays high viscosity, water-binding capacity, swelling capacity, and fermentability. We found that supplementing high-fat diet (HFD) with 6% CSF significantly improved the insulin sensitivity of obese mice without affecting their body weight. Replacing the HFD with normal chow basal diet (NCD), the presence of CSF in the feed significantly enhanced satiety, decreased energy intake, promoted weight and fat loss, and augmented insulin sensitivity. CSF also improved the intestinal morphological integrity, attenuated systemic inflammation, promoted intestinal microbiota homeostasis, and stabilized the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that was perturbed during HFD-induced obesity, and these stabilizing effects were more prominent when the basal diet was switched to NCD. The enrichment of bacteria of the S24-7 family and Allobaculum genus increased markedly in the intestine following 6% CSF supplementation- and correlated with decreased adiposity and insulin resistance. Five bacterial genera that were decreased by CSF, including Oscillospira, unclassified Lachonospitaceae, unclassified Clostridiales, unclassified Desulfovibrionaceae, and unclassified Ruminococcae, were subjected to co-occurrence network analysis and were positively correlated to adiposity and insulin resistance, indicating a key role in the microbial response to CSF. Thus, CSF has a potential to promote insulin sensitivity and even reduce obesity via beneficial regulation of the gut microecosystem. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; insulin sensitivity; systemic inflammation; combined soluble fiber; intestinal microbiota obesity; insulin sensitivity; systemic inflammation; combined soluble fiber; intestinal microbiota
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, C.; Liu, J.; Gao, J.; Wu, X.; Cui, C.; Wei, H.; Zheng, R.; Peng, J. Combined Soluble Fiber-Mediated Intestinal Microbiota Improve Insulin Sensitivity of Obese Mice. Nutrients 2020, 12, 351. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020351

AMA Style

Xu C, Liu J, Gao J, Wu X, Cui C, Wei H, Zheng R, Peng J. Combined Soluble Fiber-Mediated Intestinal Microbiota Improve Insulin Sensitivity of Obese Mice. Nutrients. 2020; 12(2):351. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020351

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Chuanhui, Jianhua Liu, Jianwei Gao, Xiaoyu Wu, Chenbin Cui, Hongkui Wei, Rong Zheng, and Jian Peng. 2020. "Combined Soluble Fiber-Mediated Intestinal Microbiota Improve Insulin Sensitivity of Obese Mice" Nutrients 12, no. 2: 351. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020351

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