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Achieving Dietary Sodium Recommendations and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Prevention through Culinary Medicine Education

1
Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
3
George Washington University Culinary Medicine Program, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC 20052, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3632; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123632
Received: 19 October 2020 / Revised: 18 November 2020 / Accepted: 24 November 2020 / Published: 26 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salt in Health and Disease—a Delicate Balance)
Sodium-reduction initiatives have been a cornerstone of preventing hypertension and broader atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) since the early 1970s. For nearly 50 years, public health and clinical guidelines have concentrated on consumer education, behavioral change, and, to a lesser extent, food policy to help reduce sodium intake among Americans. While these efforts undoubtedly helped improve awareness, average sodium consumption remains at approximately 4200 mg/day in men and 3000 mg/day in women, well above the United States Dietary Guidelines of 2300 mg/day. Culinary medicine is an emerging discipline in clinical and public-health education that provides healthcare professionals and community members with food-based knowledge and skills. With the hands-on teaching of kitchen education to individuals, culinary medicine provides eaters with tangible strategies for reducing sodium through home cooking. Here, we review opportunities for culinary medicine to help improve both individual- and population-level sodium-reduction outcomes through five main areas: increasing adherence to a plant-forward dietary pattern, food literacy, the enhancement of complementary flavors, disease-specific teaching-kitchen modules, and the delivery of culturally specific nutrition education. Through this process, we hope to further underline the value of formal, hands-on teaching-kitchen education among healthcare professionals and community members for ASCVD prevention. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary sodium; salt; medical education; nutrition; diet; cardiovascular diseases; hypertension; health literacy; minority health dietary sodium; salt; medical education; nutrition; diet; cardiovascular diseases; hypertension; health literacy; minority health
MDPI and ACS Style

Razavi, A.C.; Dyer, A.; Jones, M.; Sapin, A.; Caraballo, G.; Nace, H.; Dotson, K.; Razavi, M.A.; Harlan, T.S. Achieving Dietary Sodium Recommendations and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Prevention through Culinary Medicine Education. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3632. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123632

AMA Style

Razavi AC, Dyer A, Jones M, Sapin A, Caraballo G, Nace H, Dotson K, Razavi MA, Harlan TS. Achieving Dietary Sodium Recommendations and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Prevention through Culinary Medicine Education. Nutrients. 2020; 12(12):3632. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123632

Chicago/Turabian Style

Razavi, Alexander C., Amber Dyer, Matthew Jones, Alexander Sapin, Graciela Caraballo, Heather Nace, Kerri Dotson, Michael A. Razavi, and Timothy S. Harlan 2020. "Achieving Dietary Sodium Recommendations and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Prevention through Culinary Medicine Education" Nutrients 12, no. 12: 3632. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123632

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