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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Fat-Soluble Vitamins A, D, E and K on Vitamin Status and Metabolic Profile in Patients with Fat Malabsorption with and without Urolithiasis

1
Department of Urology, University Stone Center, University Hospital Bonn, 53127 Bonn, Germany
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Nutritional Physiology, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany
3
Department of Biostatistics, Medicine and Service Ltd., 09117 Chemnitz, Germany
4
Bonn Education Association for Dietetics r. A., 50935 Cologne, Germany
5
Clinic for Gastroenterology, Metabolic Disorders and Internal Intensive Medicine (Medical Clinic III), RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3110; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103110
Received: 20 September 2020 / Revised: 6 October 2020 / Accepted: 7 October 2020 / Published: 12 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Urinary Stone Disease)
Patients with intestinal fat malabsorption and urolithiasis are particularly at risk of acquiring fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies. The aim of the study was to evaluate the vitamin status and metabolic profile before and after the supplementation of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (ADEK) in 51 patients with fat malabsorption due to different intestinal diseases both with and without urolithiasis. Anthropometric, clinical, blood and 24-h urinary parameters and dietary intake were assessed at baseline and after ADEK supplementation for two weeks. At baseline, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity was higher in stone formers (SF; n = 10) than in non-stone formers (NSF; n = 41) but decreased significantly in SF patients after supplementation. Plasma vitamin D and E concentrations increased significantly and to a similar extent in both groups during intervention. While plasma vitamin D concentrations did not differ between the groups, vitamin E concentrations were significantly lower in the SF group than the NSF group before and after ADEK supplementation. Although vitamin D concentration increased significantly in both groups, urinary calcium excretion was not affected by ADEK supplementation. The decline in plasma AST activity in patients with urolithiasis might be attributed to the supplementation of ADEK. Patients with fat malabsorption may benefit from the supplementation of fat-soluble vitamins ADEK. View Full-Text
Keywords: intestinal resection; malabsorption; fat-soluble vitamins; vitamin D; vitamin E; ß-carotene; kidney stones; calcium oxalate stone formation; hyperoxaluria; hypocitraturia intestinal resection; malabsorption; fat-soluble vitamins; vitamin D; vitamin E; ß-carotene; kidney stones; calcium oxalate stone formation; hyperoxaluria; hypocitraturia
MDPI and ACS Style

Siener, R.; Machaka, I.; Alteheld, B.; Bitterlich, N.; Metzner, C. Effect of Fat-Soluble Vitamins A, D, E and K on Vitamin Status and Metabolic Profile in Patients with Fat Malabsorption with and without Urolithiasis. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3110.

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