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Contribution of Dietary Oxalate and Oxalate Precursors to Urinary Oxalate Excretion

Department of Urology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, FOT 1120, 1720 2nd Ave S, Birmingham, AL 35294-3411, USA
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Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010062
Received: 4 December 2020 / Revised: 23 December 2020 / Accepted: 25 December 2020 / Published: 28 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Urinary Stone Disease)
Kidney stone disease is increasing in prevalence, and the most common stone composition is calcium oxalate. Dietary oxalate intake and endogenous production of oxalate are important in the pathophysiology of calcium oxalate stone disease. The impact of dietary oxalate intake on urinary oxalate excretion and kidney stone disease risk has been assessed through large cohort studies as well as smaller studies with dietary control. Net gastrointestinal oxalate absorption influences urinary oxalate excretion. Oxalate-degrading bacteria in the gut microbiome, especially Oxalobacter formigenes, may mitigate stone risk through reducing net oxalate absorption. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is the main dietary precursor for endogenous production of oxalate with several other compounds playing a lesser role. Renal handling of oxalate and, potentially, renal synthesis of oxalate may contribute to stone formation. In this review, we discuss dietary oxalate and precursors of oxalate, their pertinent physiology in humans, and what is known about their role in kidney stone disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: calcium oxalate; dietary oxalate; kidney stones; metabolism; nephrolithiasis; oxalate; oxalate synthesis; urolithiasis calcium oxalate; dietary oxalate; kidney stones; metabolism; nephrolithiasis; oxalate; oxalate synthesis; urolithiasis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Crivelli, J.J.; Mitchell, T.; Knight, J.; Wood, K.D.; Assimos, D.G.; Holmes, R.P.; Fargue, S. Contribution of Dietary Oxalate and Oxalate Precursors to Urinary Oxalate Excretion. Nutrients 2021, 13, 62. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010062

AMA Style

Crivelli JJ, Mitchell T, Knight J, Wood KD, Assimos DG, Holmes RP, Fargue S. Contribution of Dietary Oxalate and Oxalate Precursors to Urinary Oxalate Excretion. Nutrients. 2021; 13(1):62. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010062

Chicago/Turabian Style

Crivelli, Joseph J., Tanecia Mitchell, John Knight, Kyle D. Wood, Dean G. Assimos, Ross P. Holmes, and Sonia Fargue. 2021. "Contribution of Dietary Oxalate and Oxalate Precursors to Urinary Oxalate Excretion" Nutrients 13, no. 1: 62. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010062

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