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Associations of Plasma Fatty Acid Patterns during Pregnancy with Respiratory and Allergy Outcomes at School Age

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The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3057; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103057
Received: 8 September 2020 / Revised: 30 September 2020 / Accepted: 2 October 2020 / Published: 7 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Early-Life Nutrition and Chronic Respiratory Diseases)
Fatty acids might play a role in asthma and allergy development as they can modulate immune responses. We examined among 4260 mother-child pairs participating in a population-based cohort the associations of maternal plasma fatty acid patterns during pregnancy with a child’s respiratory and allergy outcomes at school-age. In mid-pregnancy, 22 individual fatty acids were measured from maternal blood. Three patterns were previously identified by principal component analysis: A ‘high n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)’, a ‘monounsaturated and saturated fatty acid’, and a ‘high n-3 PUFA’ pattern. At the age of 10 years, a child’s lung function was assessed by spirometry, current asthma and physician-diagnosed inhalant allergy by questionnaire, and inhalant allergic sensitization by skin prick tests. A higher ‘high n-6 PUFA’ pattern was associated with a higher forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity and forced expiratory flow after exhaling 75% of forced vital capacity (Z-score difference (95% CI) 0.04 (0, 0.07) and 0.04 (0.01, 0.07), respectively, per SD increase in the fatty acid pattern). We observed no associations of maternal fatty acid patterns with a child’s asthma or allergy outcomes. Our results showed limited associations of maternal patterns of high n-6 PUFA concentrations in pregnancy with a better lung function in school-aged children. View Full-Text
Keywords: fatty acids; child; inhalant allergic sensitization and allergy; pulmonary function; prospective cohort study fatty acids; child; inhalant allergic sensitization and allergy; pulmonary function; prospective cohort study
MDPI and ACS Style

Mensink-Bout, S.M.; Voortman, T.; Dervishaj, M.; Reiss, I.K.M.; De Jongste, J.C.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Duijts, L. Associations of Plasma Fatty Acid Patterns during Pregnancy with Respiratory and Allergy Outcomes at School Age. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3057. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103057

AMA Style

Mensink-Bout SM, Voortman T, Dervishaj M, Reiss IKM, De Jongste JC, Jaddoe VWV, Duijts L. Associations of Plasma Fatty Acid Patterns during Pregnancy with Respiratory and Allergy Outcomes at School Age. Nutrients. 2020; 12(10):3057. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103057

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mensink-Bout, Sara M., Trudy Voortman, Marsela Dervishaj, Irwin K. M. Reiss, Johan C. De Jongste, Vincent W. V. Jaddoe, and Liesbeth Duijts. 2020. "Associations of Plasma Fatty Acid Patterns during Pregnancy with Respiratory and Allergy Outcomes at School Age" Nutrients 12, no. 10: 3057. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103057

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