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Article

Evaluation of an Eight-Week Whole-Food Plant-Based Lifestyle Modification Program

1
School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
2
Concentra, Occupational Medicine, 1300 S. 320th St., Federal Way, WA 98003, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2068; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092068
Received: 29 July 2019 / Revised: 20 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 3 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vegetarian, Vegan Diets and Human Health)
Poor diet quality is the leading cause of death both in the United States and worldwide, and the prevalence of obesity is at an all-time high and is projected to significantly worsen. Results from an eight-week group program utilizing an ad-libitum whole-food plant-based dietary pattern, were reviewed. There were 79 participants, all self-referred from the community, including 24 (30.4%) who were already vegetarian or vegan at baseline. Seventy-eight participants (98.7%) completed the eight-week program. Among completers, those with higher BMI at baseline lost a larger percentage of their body weight (total body weight loss of 3.0 ± SD 2.1%, 5.8 ± 2.8%, and 6.4 ± 2.5% for participants who had baseline BMI in normal, overweight, and obese range, respectively). The average weight loss for all the completers was 5.5 ± 3.0 kg (p < 0.0001). Final blood pressure and plasma lipids were reduced compared to baseline (SBP decreased 7.1 ± 15.5 mmHg (p = 0.0002), DBP decreased 7.3 ± 10.9 mmHg (p < 0.0001), total cholesterol decreased 25.2 ± 24.7 mg/dL (p < 0.0001), LDL decreased 15.3 ± 21.1 mg/dL (p < 0.0001)). Twenty-one (26.9%) participants were able to decrease or stop at least one chronic medication compared to two (2.6%) participants who required an increased dose of a chronic medication. Participants who were already vegetarian or vegan at baseline experienced statistically significant weight loss and reductions in total and LDL cholesterol. There was a non-significant trend toward less weight loss in these participants compared to participants who were non-vegetarian at baseline. Reductions in total and LDL cholesterol were not significantly different when comparing vegetarian or vegan and non-vegetarian participants. A whole-food plant-based dietary intervention may provide significant short-term benefits for both non-vegetarian, vegetarian, and vegan individuals. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant-based diet; vegan diet; vegetarian diet; low-fat diet; weight loss; hypertension; hypercholesterolemia; hyperlipidemia plant-based diet; vegan diet; vegetarian diet; low-fat diet; weight loss; hypertension; hypercholesterolemia; hyperlipidemia
MDPI and ACS Style

Campbell, E.K.; Fidahusain, M.; Campbell II, T.M. Evaluation of an Eight-Week Whole-Food Plant-Based Lifestyle Modification Program. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2068. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092068

AMA Style

Campbell EK, Fidahusain M, Campbell II TM. Evaluation of an Eight-Week Whole-Food Plant-Based Lifestyle Modification Program. Nutrients. 2019; 11(9):2068. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092068

Chicago/Turabian Style

Campbell, Erin K.; Fidahusain, Mohammad; Campbell II, Thomas M. 2019. "Evaluation of an Eight-Week Whole-Food Plant-Based Lifestyle Modification Program" Nutrients 11, no. 9: 2068. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092068

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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