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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Rice, Wheat, and Mung Bean Ingestion on Intestinal Gas Production and Postprandial Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Non-Constipation Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2
Center of Excellence on Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
3
Division of Clinical Nutrition, Department of Medicine, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2061; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092061
Received: 30 July 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 25 August 2019 / Published: 3 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Management of Gastrointestinal Diseases and Disorders)
The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of rice, mung bean, and wheat noodle ingestion on intestinal gas production and postprandial gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in non-constipation irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Methods: Twenty patients (13 F, 46 ± 11 y) underwent 8 h breath test studies and GI symptom evaluations after standard rice, wheat, or mung bean noodle meals at 8:00 a.m. in a randomized crossover study with a 1-week washout period. The same meal was ingested at 12:00 p.m. Results: The H2 and CH4 concentration in the breath samples were similar at baseline (rice:wheat:mung bean, H2 = 3.6 ± 0.5:4.1 ± 0.5:4.0 ± 0.7 ppm, CH4 = 1.3 ± 0.3:2.1 ± 0.4:1.9 ± 0.4 ppm, p > 0.05). Beginning at the fifth hour after breakfast, H2 and CH4 concentrations significantly increased after wheat compared to rice and mung bean (8 h AUC H2 = 4120 ± 2622:2267 ± 1780:2356 ± 1722, AUC CH4 = 1617 ± 1127:946 ± 664:943 ± 584 ppm-min, respectively) (p < 0.05). Bloating and satiety scores significantly increased after wheat compared to rice (p < 0.05), and increased but did not reach statistical significance compared to mung bean (p > 0.05). A higher bloating score after wheat compared to rice and mung bean was observed clearly after lunch but not after breakfast. Conclusion: Wheat ingestion produced more intestinal gas and more bloating and satiety scores compared to rice and mung bean, especially after lunch. This provides insight into the role of intestinal gas in the development of bloating symptoms in IBS. View Full-Text
Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome; rice; wheat; gluten; mung bean; intestinal gas; hydrogen; gastrointestinal symptom irritable bowel syndrome; rice; wheat; gluten; mung bean; intestinal gas; hydrogen; gastrointestinal symptom
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Linlawan, S.; Patcharatrakul, T.; Somlaw, N.; Gonlachanvit, S. Effect of Rice, Wheat, and Mung Bean Ingestion on Intestinal Gas Production and Postprandial Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Non-Constipation Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2061.

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