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Comparative Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Concentrated, Hydrolyzed, and Isolated Whey Protein Supplementation on Body Composition of Physical Activity Practitioners

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Graduate Program in Health Sciences—Federal University of Grande Dourados (UFGD), Dourados 79804-970, Brazil
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Faculty of Health Sciences—Federal University of Grande Dourados/Universitary Hospital of Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados 79823-501, Brazil
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Graduate Program in Nutrition—Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Santa Catarina 88040-970, Brazil
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Graduate Program in Food, Nutrition and Health—Federal University of Grande Dourados (UFGD), Dourados 79804-970, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2047; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092047
Received: 19 July 2019 / Revised: 22 August 2019 / Accepted: 22 August 2019 / Published: 2 September 2019
Whey protein (WP) is a dairy food supplement and, due to its effects on fat-free mass (FFM) gain and fat mass (FM) loss, it has been widely consumed by resistance training practitioners. This review analyzed the impact of WP supplementation in its concentrated (WPC), hydrolyzed (WPH) and isolated (WPI) forms, comparing it exclusively to isocaloric placebos. Random effect meta-analyses were performed from the final and initial body composition values of 246 healthy athletes undergoing 64.5 ± 15.3 days of training in eight randomized clinical trials (RCT) collected systematically from five scientific databases. The weighted mean difference (WMD) was statistically significant for FM loss (WMD = −0.96, 95% CI = −1.37, −0.55, p < 0.001) and, in the analysis of subgroups, this effect was maintained for the WPC (WMD = −0.63, 95% CI = −1.19, −0.06, p = 0.030), with protein content between 51% and 80% (WMD = −1.53; 95% CI = −2.13, −0.93, p < 0.001), and only for regular physical activity practitioners (WMD = −0.95; 95% CI = −1.70, −0.19, p = 0.014). There was no significant effect on FFM in any of the scenarios investigated (p > 0.05). Due to several and important limitations, more detailed analyses are required regarding FFM gain. View Full-Text
Keywords: whey proteins; exercise; sports; resistance training; fat-free mass; fat mass; systematic review whey proteins; exercise; sports; resistance training; fat-free mass; fat mass; systematic review
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A. Castro, L.H.; S. de Araújo, F.H.; M. Olimpio, M.Y.; B. de B. Primo, R.; T. Pereira, T.; F. Lopes, L.A.; B. S. de M. Trindade, E.; Fernandes, R.; A. Oesterreich, S. Comparative Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Concentrated, Hydrolyzed, and Isolated Whey Protein Supplementation on Body Composition of Physical Activity Practitioners. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2047.

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