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Article

Preconception Health Attitudes and Behaviours of Women: A Qualitative Investigation

Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3168, Australia
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Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1490; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071490
Received: 17 April 2019 / Revised: 18 June 2019 / Accepted: 26 June 2019 / Published: 29 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Weight Gain)
The preconception period is a critical window in which maternal health can profoundly affect both individual and intergenerational health. Despite its importance, little information about women’s preconception health attitudes, behaviours and information preferences exists, yet these details are vital to inform targeted health communication. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore women’s attitudes to preconception health (areas of importance, support sources, enablers and barriers), behaviours (information seeking and health actions taken) and information preferences. Interviews were transcribed, coded and thematically analysed. Fifteen women participated (n = 7 preconception, n = 7 pregnant and n = 1 postpartum). Women perceived optimising lifestyle behaviours including a healthy diet, regular physical activity, reducing alcohol intake and pre-pregnancy vitamin supplementation as important preconception health actions to adopt. Few women acknowledged the importance of formal preconception health checks and screening with health professionals. Barriers to achieving health behaviour change included anxiety, stress and challenges obtaining reputable information. Participants reported a lack of preconception information about supplementation requirements, safe foods and exercise recommendations. Information preferences included the internet or their general practitioner. Whilst women predominantly prioritised optimising diet and physical activity prior to pregnancy, there appeared to be limited awareness of preconception health checks and screening, highlighting a need for broader awareness of overall preconception health and wellbeing. View Full-Text
Keywords: preconception; pre-pregnancy; pre-natal; attitudes; health behaviour; pregnancy planning preconception; pre-pregnancy; pre-natal; attitudes; health behaviour; pregnancy planning
MDPI and ACS Style

Khan, N.N.; Boyle, J.A.; Lang, A.Y.; Harrison, C.L. Preconception Health Attitudes and Behaviours of Women: A Qualitative Investigation. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1490. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071490

AMA Style

Khan NN, Boyle JA, Lang AY, Harrison CL. Preconception Health Attitudes and Behaviours of Women: A Qualitative Investigation. Nutrients. 2019; 11(7):1490. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071490

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khan, Nadia N., Jacqueline A. Boyle, Adina Y. Lang, and Cheryce L. Harrison 2019. "Preconception Health Attitudes and Behaviours of Women: A Qualitative Investigation" Nutrients 11, no. 7: 1490. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071490

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