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Barriers and Facilitators to Weight and Lifestyle Management in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: General Practitioners’ Perspectives

Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3168, Australia
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Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1024; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051024
Received: 27 March 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 29 April 2019 / Published: 7 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Weight Gain)
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Abstract

Background: Weight and lifestyle management is advocated as the first-line treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by evidence-based guidelines. Current literature describes both systems- and individual-related challenges that general practitioners (GPs) face when attempting to implement guideline recommendations for lifestyle management into clinical practice for the general population. The GPs’ perspective in relation to weight and lifestyle advice for PCOS has not been captured. Methods: Fifteen GPs were recruited to take part in semi-structured interviews. NVIVO software was used for qualitative analysis. Results: We report that GPs unanimously acknowledge the importance of weight and lifestyle management in PCOS. Practice was influenced by both systems-related and individual-related facilitators and barriers. Individual-related barriers include perceived lack of patient motivation for weight loss, time pressures, lack of financial reimbursement, and weight management being professionally unrewarding. System-related barriers include costs of accessing allied health professionals and unavailability of allied health professionals in certain locations. Individual-related facilitators include motivated patient subgroups such as those trying to get pregnant and specific communication techniques such as motivational interviewing. System-related facilitators include the GP’s role in chronic disease management. Conclusions: This study contributes to the understanding of barriers and facilitators that could be addressed to optimize weight and lifestyle management in women with PCOS in primary care. View Full-Text
Keywords: PCOS; general practitioners; primary care; weight management; lifestyle management; implementation; guidelines; barriers; facilitators PCOS; general practitioners; primary care; weight management; lifestyle management; implementation; guidelines; barriers; facilitators
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Arasu, A.; Moran, L.J.; Robinson, T.; Boyle, J.; Lim, S. Barriers and Facilitators to Weight and Lifestyle Management in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: General Practitioners’ Perspectives. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1024.

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