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Plasma Metabolites Associated with Coffee Consumption: A Metabolomic Approach within the PREDIMED Study

1
Human Nutrition Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Institut d’Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili, Rovira i Virgili University, 43201 Reus, Spain
2
CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
3
University of Navarra, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, IdiSNA, 31009 Pamplona, Spain
4
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
6
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA
7
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
8
Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition Institut d’ Investigacions Biomediques August Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, 08007 Barcelona, Spain
9
Lipid Clinic, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques August Pi Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, 08007 Barcelona, Spain
10
Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group (CARIN), Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), 08003 Barcelona, Spain
11
Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Álava, 01009 Vitoria, Spain
12
Illes Balears Health Research Institute (IdISBa), Hospital Son Espases, 07120 Palma de Mallorca, Spain
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Department of Family, Research Unit, Distrito Sanitario Atención Primaria Sevilla, 41013 Sevilla, Spain
14
Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas, Spain
15
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
16
Channing Division for Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, MA 02115, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1032; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051032
Received: 5 April 2019 / Revised: 2 May 2019 / Accepted: 3 May 2019 / Published: 8 May 2019
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Abstract

Few studies have examined the association of a wide range of metabolites with total and subtypes of coffee consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of plasma metabolites with total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee consumption. We also assessed the ability of metabolites to discriminate between coffee consumption categories. This is a cross-sectional analysis of 1664 participants from the PREDIMED study. Metabolites were semiquantitatively profiled using a multiplatform approach. Consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee and decaffeinated coffee was assessed by using a validated food frequency questionnaire. We assessed associations between 387 metabolite levels with total, caffeinated, or decaffeinated coffee consumption (≥50 mL coffee/day) using elastic net regression analysis. Ten-fold cross-validation analyses were used to estimate the discriminative accuracy of metabolites for total and subtypes of coffee. We identified different sets of metabolites associated with total coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption. These metabolites consisted of lipid species (e.g., sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine) or were derived from glycolysis (alpha-glycerophosphate) and polyphenol metabolism (hippurate). Other metabolites included caffeine, 5-acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil, cotinine, kynurenic acid, glycocholate, lactate, and allantoin. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.60 (95% CI 0.56–0.64), 0.78 (95% CI 0.75–0.81) and 0.52 (95% CI 0.49–0.55), in the multimetabolite model, for total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee consumption, respectively. Our comprehensive metabolic analysis did not result in a new, reliable potential set of metabolites for coffee consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: coffee; caffeine; plasma; metabolomics; PREDIMED coffee; caffeine; plasma; metabolomics; PREDIMED
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Papandreou, C.; Hernández-Alonso, P.; Bulló, M.; Ruiz-Canela, M.; Yu, E.; Guasch-Ferré, M.; Toledo, E.; Dennis, C.; Deik, A.; Clish, C.; Razquin, C.; Corella, D.; Estruch, R.; Ros, E.; Fitó, M.; Arós, F.; Fiol, M.; Lapetra, J.; Ruano, C.; Liang, L.; Martínez-González, M.A.; Hu, F.B.; Salas-Salvadó, J. Plasma Metabolites Associated with Coffee Consumption: A Metabolomic Approach within the PREDIMED Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1032.

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