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Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 828; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040828

Food-Insecure Household’s Self-Reported Perceptions of Food Labels, Product Attributes and Consumption Behaviours

1
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
2
Foodbank Western Australia, Perth Airport, WA 6105, Australia
3
School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
4
School of Science, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 March 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups)
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PDF [258 KB, uploaded 12 April 2019]

Abstract

Dietary compromises related to food insecurity profoundly undermine health and constitute a serious public health issue, even in developed nations. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of food labelling and product attributes on the purchasing choices of food-insecure households in Australia. An online survey containing 19 food choice and 28 purchasing behaviours questions was completed by 1056 adults responsible for household grocery shopping. The short form of the US Household Food Security Survey Module was used as the food security indicator. Multinomial logistic regression modelling was employed to analyse the survey data. Respondents were classified as having either high-marginal (63.4%, n = 670), low (19.8%, n = 209) or very low (16.8%, n = 177) food security. Respondents with low or very low food security status were less likely to self-report understanding the information on the back of packaging (p < 0.001), find information on food labels useful (p = 0.002) or be influenced by product nutrition information (p = 0.002). Convenience (p < 0.001), organic (p = 0.027) and supermarket-branded products (p < 0.001) were more likely to be rated as important by food-insecure respondents when compared to their food-secure counterparts. When asked to rate “how healthy” their diet was, high–marginal FS respondents were twice as likely describe their diet as healthy than very low FS respondents (p = 0.001). View Full-Text
Keywords: vulnerable groups; food poverty; food insecurity; food literacy; public health vulnerable groups; food poverty; food insecurity; food literacy; public health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Butcher, L.M.; Ryan, M.M.; O’Sullivan, T.A.; Lo, J.; Devine, A. Food-Insecure Household’s Self-Reported Perceptions of Food Labels, Product Attributes and Consumption Behaviours. Nutrients 2019, 11, 828.

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