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Open AccessArticle

Congruent Validity of Resting Energy Expenditure Predictive Equations in Young Adults

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Departament of Medical Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
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PROmoting FITness and Health through physical activity research group (PROFITH), Department of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
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Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, and Einthoven Laboratory for Experimental Vascular Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Post Zone C7Q, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
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Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden
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Institute for Innovation & Sustainable Development in Food Chain (IS-FOOD), Public University of Navarra, 31006 Pamplona, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 223; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020223
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 22 January 2019
Having valid and reliable resting energy expenditure (REE) estimations is crucial to establish reachable goals for dietary and exercise interventions. However, most of the REE predictive equations were developed some time ago and, as the body composition of the current population has changed, it is highly relevant to assess the validity of REE predictive equations in contemporary young adults. In addition, little is known about the role of sex and weight status on the validity of these predictive equations. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the role of sex and weight status in congruent validity of REE predictive equations in young adults. A total of 132 young healthy adults (67.4% women, 18–26 years old) participated in the study. We measured REE by indirect calorimetry strictly following the standard procedures, and we compared it to 45 predictive equations. The most accurate equations were the following: (i) the Schofield and the “Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization/United Nations” (FAO/WHO/UNU) equations in normal weight men; (ii) the Mifflin and FAO/WHO/UNU equations in normal weight women; (iii) the Livingston and Korth equations in overweight men; (iv) the Johnstone and Frankenfield equations in overweight women; (v) the Owen and Bernstein equations in obese men; and (vi) the Owen equation in obese women. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the best equation to estimate REE depends on sex and weight status in young healthy adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic rate; basal metabolism; indirect calorimetry; energy balance; obesity metabolic rate; basal metabolism; indirect calorimetry; energy balance; obesity
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Amaro-Gahete, F.J.; Sanchez-Delgado, G.; Alcantara, J.M.; Martinez-Tellez, B.; Muñoz-Hernandez, V.; Merchan-Ramirez, E.; Löf, M.; Labayen, I.; Ruiz, J.R. Congruent Validity of Resting Energy Expenditure Predictive Equations in Young Adults. Nutrients 2019, 11, 223.

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