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Article

Altered Processing of Visual Food Stimuli in Adolescents with Loss of Control Eating

1
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Tuebingen, Schleichstrasse 4, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany
2
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93053 Regensburg, Germany
3
Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Liebiggasse 5, 1010 Vienna, Austria
4
Eating and Weight Disorders Program, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020210
Received: 28 November 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 16 January 2019 / Published: 22 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Childhood Eating and Feeding Disturbances)
Loss of control eating (LOC) constitutes a common eating pathology in childhood and adolescence. Models developed for adult patients stress a biased processing of food-related stimuli as an important maintaining factor. To our knowledge, however, no EEG study to date investigated the processing of visual food stimuli in children or adolescents with LOC. Adolescents with at least one self-reported episode of LOC in the last four weeks and a matched control group completed a modified Go/NoGo task, with a numerical target or non-target stimulus being presented on one side of the screen and an irrelevant high-calorie food or neutral stimulus being presented on the opposite side. Mean P3 amplitudes were analyzed. In Go trials, the LOC group’s mean P3 amplitudes were comparable irrespective of distractor category, while for NoGo trials, mean P3 amplitudes were significantly higher when the distractor was a high-calorie food stimulus. This pattern was reversed in the control group. Results are interpreted in light of Gray’s reinforcement sensitivity theory. They might reflect altered processes of behavioral inhibition in adolescents with LOC upon confrontation with visual food stimuli. View Full-Text
Keywords: loss of control eating; adolescents; event-related potentials; P3; Go/NoGo task; visual food stimuli loss of control eating; adolescents; event-related potentials; P3; Go/NoGo task; visual food stimuli
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MDPI and ACS Style

Biehl, S.C.; Ansorge, U.; Naumann, E.; Svaldi, J. Altered Processing of Visual Food Stimuli in Adolescents with Loss of Control Eating. Nutrients 2019, 11, 210. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020210

AMA Style

Biehl SC, Ansorge U, Naumann E, Svaldi J. Altered Processing of Visual Food Stimuli in Adolescents with Loss of Control Eating. Nutrients. 2019; 11(2):210. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020210

Chicago/Turabian Style

Biehl, Stefanie C.; Ansorge, Ulrich; Naumann, Eva; Svaldi, Jennifer. 2019. "Altered Processing of Visual Food Stimuli in Adolescents with Loss of Control Eating" Nutrients 11, no. 2: 210. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020210

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