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Open AccessArticle

Changes in Weight and Substrate Oxidation in Overweight Adults Following Isomaltulose Intake During a 12-Week Weight Loss Intervention: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial

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Oxford Brookes Centre for Nutrition and Health, Department of Sport, Health Sciences and Social Work, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK
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BENEO-Institute, BENEO GmbH, Wormser Straße 11, 67283 Obrigheim/Pfalz, Germany
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Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and National University Health System, Centre for Translational Medicine, 14 Medical Drive #07-02, MD 6 Building, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Singapore 117599, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2367; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102367
Received: 28 August 2019 / Revised: 24 September 2019 / Accepted: 2 October 2019 / Published: 4 October 2019
Low-glycemic compared to high-glycemic diets have been shown to improve metabolic status and enhance fat oxidation. The randomized, double-blind, controlled intervention study aimed to evaluate the effects of an energy-reduced diet containing isomaltulose (ISO, Palatinose™) versus sucrose (SUC) on body weight loss. Sixty-four healthy overweight/obese adults were allocated to consume either 40 g/day ISO or SUC added to an energy-reduced diet for 12 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, body composition, and energy metabolism were assessed at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Fifty participants (age: 40.7 ± 11.7 y; BMI: 29.4 ± 2.7 kg/m²) completed the study. During the 12 weeks, both groups significantly lost weight (p < 0.001), which was more pronounced following ISO (−3.2 ± 2.9 vs. −2.1 ± 2.6 kg; p = 0.258). Moreover, for participants in the ISO group, this was accompanied by a significant reduction in fat mass (ISO: −1.9 ± 2.5, p = 0.005; SUC: −0.9 ± 2.6%, p = 0.224). The overall decrease in energy intake was significantly higher in the ISO compared to that in the SUC group (p = 0.022). In addition, breakfast containing ISO induced a significantly lower increase in postprandial respiratory quotient (RQ) (mean incremental area under the curve (iAUC)2h for ISO vs. SUC: 4.8 ± 4.1 vs. 6.9 ± 3.1, p = 0.047). The results suggest that ISO in exchange for SUC may help to facilitate body weight reduction, lower postprandial RQ associated with higher fat oxidation, and reduce energy intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: isomaltulose; glycemic index; overweight; Palatinose™; weight management; substrate oxidation; diet isomaltulose; glycemic index; overweight; Palatinose™; weight management; substrate oxidation; diet
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Lightowler, H.; Schweitzer, L.; Theis, S.; Henry, C.J. Changes in Weight and Substrate Oxidation in Overweight Adults Following Isomaltulose Intake During a 12-Week Weight Loss Intervention: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2367.

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