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Open AccessArticle

Obesity and 25(OH)D Serum Concentration Are More Important than Vitamin D Intake for Changes in Nutritional Status Indicators: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study in a State Capital City in Southern Brazil

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Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Trindade University Campus, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina 88040-370, Brazil
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Department of Public Health, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Trindade University Campus, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina 88040-370, Brazil
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The Bernard Lown Scholars in Cardiovascular Health Program, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Building 1, Room 1210, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Center for Rural Sciences, Bioscience and Unique Health Coordination, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Curitibanos University Campus, Curitibanos, Santa Catarina 89520-000, Brazil
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Health Sciences Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Araranguá University Campus, Araranguá, Santa Catarina 88906-072, Brazil
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Discipline of General Practice, Adelaide Medical School, Room 813, Level 8, Hughes Building, North Terrace Campus, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2366; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102366
Received: 12 June 2019 / Revised: 1 July 2019 / Accepted: 10 July 2019 / Published: 4 October 2019
Our objective was to investigate the relationship between dietary vitamin D intake and serum concentration of vitamin D (25(OH)D) on changes in body weight, waist circumference (WC), and body mass index (BMI), and to determine if this relationship changes between obese and non-obese individuals at baseline and those who have or do not have 25(OH)D deficiency. This was a prospective study with a sample of 572 individuals aged 25–65 years, who were participants in the cohort study EpiFloripa Adults. Changes in weight (in kg), BMI, and WC between 2012 and 2014 were evaluated as outcomes. The main exposure was the dietary intake of vitamin D (2012), and the 25(OH)D serum concentration was secondary. When the analyses were stratified by the presence of obesity in the baseline, among obese individuals it was observed that those in the extreme categories of vitamin D intake had an average gain of 3.0 kg in weight, 0.9 kg/m2 in BMI, and 1.7–2.7 cm in WC. When 25(OH)D serum concentration were incorporated into the analyses, it was observed that non-obese subjects not having 25(OH)D deficiency had a mean reduction of 2.3 cm in WC. In conclusion, the increases in body weight, BMI, and WC were higher over time in obese patients with deficient 25(OH)D serum concentration, regardless of dietary vitamin D intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary vitamin D intake; 25(OH)D serum concentration; body mass index; weight; waist circumference; prospective study dietary vitamin D intake; 25(OH)D serum concentration; body mass index; weight; waist circumference; prospective study
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Cembranel, F.; d’Orsi, E.; Wagner, K.J.P.; Giehl, M.W.C.; Moreno, Y.M.F.; González-Chica, D.A. Obesity and 25(OH)D Serum Concentration Are More Important than Vitamin D Intake for Changes in Nutritional Status Indicators: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study in a State Capital City in Southern Brazil. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2366.

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