Next Article in Journal
Longitudinal Associations between Monetary Value of the Diet, DASH Diet Score and the Allostatic Load among Middle-Aged Urban Adults
Previous Article in Journal
Rhodiola/Cordyceps-Based Herbal Supplement Promotes Endurance Training-Improved Body Composition But Not Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Biomarkers: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Study
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Association between Different Animal Protein Sources and Liver Status in Obese Subjects with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Fatty Liver in Obesity (FLiO) Study

1
Department of Nutrition, Food Sciences and Physiology and Centre for Nutrition Research, Faculty of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Spain
2
Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), 31008 Pamplona, Spain
3
Clinical Chemistry Department, University Clinic of Navarra, University of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Spain
4
Liver Unit, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Spain
5
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), 28029 Madrid, Spain
6
Department of Radiology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Spain
7
Biomedical Research Centre Network in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
8
Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, University of Balearic Islands, 07122 Palma, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2359; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102359
Received: 29 August 2019 / Revised: 27 September 2019 / Accepted: 30 September 2019 / Published: 3 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meat Consumption and Health Effects)
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Obesity and unhealthy dietary habits are described as risk factors for NAFLD. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the consumption of different animal protein sources and hepatic status in NAFLD adults. A total of 112 overweight/obese participants with NAFLD from Fatty Liver in Obesity (FLiO) study were evaluated at baseline. Diet, body composition, and biochemical variables were evaluated. Hepatic status was also assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ultrasonography, and elastography. Red meat consumption showed a positive relationship with liver iron content (r = 0.224; p = 0.021) and ferritin concentration (r = 0.196; p = 0.037). Processed meat consumption exhibited a positive association with liver iron content (r = 0.308; p = 0.001), which was also found in the quantile regression (β = 0.079; p = 0.028). Fish consumption was related with lower concentration of ferritin (r = −0.200; p = 0.034). This association was further evidenced in the regression model (β = −0.720; p = 0.033). These findings suggest that the consumption of different animal protein sources differentially impact on liver status in obese subjects with NAFLD, showing fish consumption as a healthier alternative for towards NAFLD features. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; NAFLD; fatty liver; red meat; processed meat; fish; ferritin; iron obesity; NAFLD; fatty liver; red meat; processed meat; fish; ferritin; iron
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Recaredo, G.; Marin-Alejandre, B.A.; Cantero, I.; Monreal, J.I.; Herrero, J.I.; Benito-Boillos, A.; Elorz, M.; Tur, J.A.; Martínez, J.A.; Zulet, M.A.; Abete, I. Association between Different Animal Protein Sources and Liver Status in Obese Subjects with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Fatty Liver in Obesity (FLiO) Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2359.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop