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Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1232; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091232

“Your Body Feels Better When You Drink Water”: Parent and School-Age Children’s Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Cognitions

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University, 26 Nichol Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
2
Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
3
Division of Animal and Nutritional Sciences, West Virginia University, 1194 Evansdale Dr. G28, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 August 2018 / Revised: 30 August 2018 / Accepted: 2 September 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Beverages on Ingestive Behavior)
Full-Text   |   PDF [261 KB, uploaded 5 September 2018]

Abstract

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are a leading source of added sugar in the American diet. Further, ingestion of added sugars from SSBs exceeds recommendations. Thus, interventions that effectively reduce SSB consumption are needed. Focus group discussions with parents (n = 37) and school-aged children between the ages of 6 and 11 years (n = 41) from Florida, New Jersey, and West Virginia were led by trained moderators using Social Cognitive Theory as a guide. Trends and themes that emerged from the content analysis of the focus group data indicated that both parents and children felt that limiting SSBs was important to health and weight control. However, parents and children reported consuming an average of 1.85 ± 2.38 SD and 2.13 ± 2.52 SD SSB servings/week, respectively. Parents and children were aware that parent behaviors influenced kids, but parents reported modeling healthy SSB behaviors was difficult. Busy schedules, including more frequent parties and events as children get older, were another barrier to limiting SSBs. Parents were most successful at limiting SSBs when they were not in the house. This qualitative research provides novel insights into parents’ and children’s cognitions (e.g., beliefs, attitudes), barriers, and facilitators related to SSB ingestion. Consideration of these insights during nutrition intervention development has the potential to improve intervention effectiveness in reducing SSB intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened beverages; children; parents; social cognitive theory; nutrition education; health promotion sugar-sweetened beverages; children; parents; social cognitive theory; nutrition education; health promotion
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Eck, K.M.; Dinesen, A.; Garcia, E.; Delaney, C.L.; Famodu, O.A.; Olfert, M.D.; Byrd-Bredbenner, C.; Shelnutt, K.P. “Your Body Feels Better When You Drink Water”: Parent and School-Age Children’s Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Cognitions. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1232.

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