Next Article in Journal
Keep Calm and Carry on: Parental Opinions on Improving Clinical Dietary Trials for Young Children
Next Article in Special Issue
Methionine Partially Replaced by Methionyl-Methionine Dipeptide Improves Reproductive Performance over Methionine Alone in Methionine-Deficient Mice
Previous Article in Journal
Association of Anabolic Effect of Calcitriol with Osteoclast-Derived Wnt 10b Secretion
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nutritional Composition Assessment of 3000 Individualized Parenteral Nutrition Bags in a Tertiary Referral Hospital: Current Prescribing Patterns
Open AccessReview

Non-Antibiotic Antimicrobial Catheter Lock Solutions in Patients on Home Parenteral Nutrition

1
Division of Gastroenterology & Gastrointestinal Diseases Research Unit, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada
2
Specialized Complex Care Program, St. Michael’s Hospital, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5B 1W8, Canada
3
Division of Gastroenterology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1165; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091165
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 22 August 2018 / Published: 25 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Parenteral Nutrition)
Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) are dependent on central venous access for long-term sustenance, and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. As such, there is much interest in finding new methods for preventing CRBSIs in patients on HPN. As it is thought that these infections are preceded by microbial colonization of the catheter, one approach is to use antimicrobial catheter lock solutions. Although antibiotic catheter lock solutions have been present for decades, their use has been mostly limited to the treatment of CRBSIs due to concern for promoting microbial resistance. Recently, however, with the advent of non-antibiotic antimicrobial catheter lock solutions, this approach is gaining popularity as a promising method to decrease rates of CRBSI in HPN patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: central venous catheter; parenteral nutrition; catheter-related infections; anti-bacterial agents central venous catheter; parenteral nutrition; catheter-related infections; anti-bacterial agents
MDPI and ACS Style

Noelting, J.; Jurewitsch, B.; Allard, J.P. Non-Antibiotic Antimicrobial Catheter Lock Solutions in Patients on Home Parenteral Nutrition. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1165.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop