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Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1090; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081090

Intakes, Adequacy, and Biomarker Status of Iron, Folate, and Vitamin B12 in Māori and Non-Māori Octogenarians: Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ)

1
College of Health, Massey University, Auckland 0632, New Zealand
2
School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland 1072, New Zealand
3
James Henare Māori Research Centre, University of Auckland, Auckland 1072, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 July 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
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Abstract

Advanced-age adults may be at risk of iron, folate, and vitamin B12 deficiency due to low food intake and poor absorption. This study aimed to investigate the intake and adequacy of iron, folate, and vitamin B12 and their relationship with respective biomarker status. Face-to-face interviews with 216 Māori and 362 non-Māori included a detailed dietary assessment using 2 × 24-h multiple pass recalls. Serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation, red blood cell folate, serum folate, serum vitamin B12 and hemoglobin were available at baseline. Regression techniques were used to estimate the association between dietary intake and biomarkers. The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) was met by most participants (>88%) for dietary iron and vitamin B12 (>74%) but less than half (>42%) for folate. Increased dietary folate intake was associated with increased red blood cell (RBC) folate for Māori (p = 0.001), non-Māori (p = 0.014) and serum folate for Māori (p < 0.001). Folate intake >215 µg/day was associated with reduced risk of deficiency in RBC folate for Māori (p = 0.001). Strategies are needed to optimize the intake and bioavailability of foods rich in folate. There were no significant associations between dietary iron and vitamin B12 intake and their respective biomarkers, serum iron and serum vitamin B12. View Full-Text
Keywords: iron; folate; vitamin B12; biomarkers; older adults; octogenarians; LiLACS NZ iron; folate; vitamin B12; biomarkers; older adults; octogenarians; LiLACS NZ
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Pillay, D.; Wham, C.; Moyes, S.; Muru-Lanning, M.; Teh, R.; Kerse, N. Intakes, Adequacy, and Biomarker Status of Iron, Folate, and Vitamin B12 in Māori and Non-Māori Octogenarians: Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ). Nutrients 2018, 10, 1090.

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