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Open AccessArticle

Microencapsulation and the Characterization of Polyherbal Formulation (PHF) Rich in Natural Polyphenolic Compounds

1
Colin Ratledge Center for Microbial Lipids, School of Agriculture Engineering and Food Science, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049, China
2
UQ Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, 37 Kent Street Woolloongabba, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
3
Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
4
Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, VIC 3216, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 843; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070843
Received: 22 May 2018 / Revised: 17 June 2018 / Accepted: 22 June 2018 / Published: 28 June 2018
Microencapsulation of polyherbal formulation (PHF) extract was carried out by freeze drying method, by employing gum arabic (GA), gelatin (GE), and maltodextrin (MD) with their designated different combinations as encapsulating wall materials. Antioxidant components (i.e., total phenolic contents (TPC), total flavonoids contents (TFC), and total condensed tannins (TCT)), antioxidant activity (i.e., DPPH, β-carotene & ABTS+ assays), moisture contents, water activity (aw), solubility, hygroscopicity, glass transition temperature (Tg), particle size, morphology, in vitroα-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition and bioavailability ratios of the powders were investigated. Amongst all encapsulated products, TB (5% GA & 5% MD) and TC (10% GA) have proven to be the best treatments with respect to the highest preservation of antioxidant components. These treatments also exhibited higher antioxidant potential by DPPH and β-carotene assays and noteworthy for an ABTS+ assays. Moreover, the aforesaid treatments also demonstrated lower moisture content, aw, particle size and higher solubility, hygroscopicity and glass transition temperature (Tg). All freeze dried samples showed irregular (asymmetrical) microcrystalline structures. Furthermore, TB and TC also illustrated the highest in vitro anti-diabetic potential due to great potency for inhibiting α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities. In the perspective of bioavailability, TA, TB and TC demonstrated the excellent bioavailability ratios (%). Furthermore, the photochemical profiling of ethanolic extract of PHF was also revealed to find out the bioactive compounds. View Full-Text
Keywords: microencapsulation; polyphenols; freeze-drying; antioxidant activity; in vitro dialyzability; in vitro anti-diabetic potential microencapsulation; polyphenols; freeze-drying; antioxidant activity; in vitro dialyzability; in vitro anti-diabetic potential
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Hussain, S.A.; Hameed, A.; Nazir, Y.; Naz, T.; Wu, Y.; Suleria, H.A.R.; Song, Y. Microencapsulation and the Characterization of Polyherbal Formulation (PHF) Rich in Natural Polyphenolic Compounds. Nutrients 2018, 10, 843.

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