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Open AccessArticle

Protective Effects of Salvianolic Acid A against Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Acute Colitis in Rats

by Kai Wang 1,†, Qinqin Yang 2,3,†, Quanxin Ma 3, Bei Wang 1,4, Zhengrui Wan 1, Minli Chen 3,* and Liming Wu 1,*
1
Institute of Apicultural Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
2
Zhejiang Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hangzhou 310007, China
3
Comparative medical Research Center, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053, China
4
College of Bee Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060791
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 9 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 19 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiome and Human Health)
Salvianolic acid A (SAA) is an active phenolic acid derived from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen). To explore whether SAA has a therapeutic effect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an acute colitis model was induced in rats by administering 3% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) for one week. SAA in doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/day was given by tail vein injection during DSS administration. Both dosages of SAA ameliorated the colitis symptoms, with decreases observed in the disease activity index. A high dosage of SAA (8 mg/kg/day) promoted a longer colon length and an improved colonic tissue structure, compared with the DSS-treated rats not receiving SAA. SAA dose-dependently decreased colonic gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-6). Moreover, a high dosage of SAA protected against DSS-induced damage to tight junctions (TJ) in the rats’ colons, by increasing TJ-related gene expression (ZO-1 and occuldin). Finally, using 16S rRNA phylogenetic sequencing, we found that SAA modulated gut microbiota imbalance during colitis by increasing the gut microbial diversity as well as selectively promoting some probiotic populations, including Akkermansia spp. Our study suggests that SAA is a promising candidate for the treatment of IBD. View Full-Text
Keywords: Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge; salvianolic acid A; inflammatory bowel disease; dextran sodium sulphate; gut microbiota Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge; salvianolic acid A; inflammatory bowel disease; dextran sodium sulphate; gut microbiota
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Wang, K.; Yang, Q.; Ma, Q.; Wang, B.; Wan, Z.; Chen, M.; Wu, L. Protective Effects of Salvianolic Acid A against Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Acute Colitis in Rats. Nutrients 2018, 10, 791.

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