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Open AccessArticle

The Impact of Abdominal Fat Levels on All-Cause Mortality Risk in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

1
Department of Nephrology, Matsunami General Hospital, 185-1 Dendai, Kasamatsu, Gifu 501-6062, Japan
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Matsunami General Hospital, 185-1 Dendai, Kasamatsu, Gifu 501-6062, Japan
3
Division of Medical Statistics, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi 470-1192, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040480
Received: 14 March 2018 / Revised: 4 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 12 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and Renal Function)
Although an increased body mass index is associated with lower mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD), known as the “obesity paradox,” the relationship of abdominal fat levels with all-cause mortality has rarely been studied. We investigated the impact of computed-tomography-measured abdominal fat levels (visceral fat area (VFA) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA)) on all-cause mortality in this population. A total of 201 patients undergoing HD were enrolled and cross-classified by VFA and SFA levels according to each cutoff point, VFA of 78.7 cm2 and SFA of 93.2 cm2, based on the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve as following; group 1 (G1): lower VFA and lower SFA, G2: higher VFA and lower SFA, G3: lower VFA and higher SFA, G4: higher VFA and higher SFA. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, 67 patients died. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed 10-year survival rates of 29.0%, 50.0%, 62.6%, and 72.4% in G1, G2, G3, and G4 (p < 0.0001), respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio was 0.30 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05–1.09, p = 0.070) for G2 vs. G1, 0.37 (95% CI 0.18–0.76, p = 0.0065) for G3 vs. G1, and 0.21 (95% CI 0.07–0.62, p = 0.0035) for G4 vs. G1, respectively. In conclusion, combined SFA and VFA levels were negatively associated with risks for all-cause mortality in patients undergoing HD. These results are a manifestation of the “obesity paradox.” View Full-Text
Keywords: hemodialysis; obesity paradox; abdominal fat level; visceral fat area; subcutaneous fat area; all-cause mortality hemodialysis; obesity paradox; abdominal fat level; visceral fat area; subcutaneous fat area; all-cause mortality
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Yajima, T.; Yajima, K.; Takahashi, H.; Yasuda, K. The Impact of Abdominal Fat Levels on All-Cause Mortality Risk in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis. Nutrients 2018, 10, 480.

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