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Co-Ingestion of Rice Bran Soymilk or Plain Soymilk with White Bread: Effects on the Glycemic and Insulinemic Response

1
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and National University Health System (NUHS), Centre for Translational Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 14 Medical Drive #07-02, Singapore 117599, Singapore
2
Health Care R&D, Sunstar Inc., Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1044, Japan
3
Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, S14 Level 5, Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040449
Received: 20 February 2018 / Revised: 29 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 4 April 2018
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Abstract

The regular consumption of soy products is associated with inverse incidence of type 2 diabetes, and there has been an increasing interest in the glycemia reducing potential of rice bran and its components. In this study, we investigated whether consuming soymilk with the addition of rice bran (fiber) can reduce the glycemic response of a carbohydrate meal. Seventeen healthy Asian men (BMI: 18.5–29 kg/m2) participated in this randomized crossover trial. On four occasions, they consumed white bread (two times) and white bread with two different soymilks differing in protein and rice bran content. Blood samples were taken to measure glucose and insulin response over a period of 3 hours. Taking the glycemic index (GI) value of white bread as a reference value of 100, the GI of white bread when co-ingested with rice bran soymilk (RBS) was 83.1 (±7.7) and sugar-free soymilk (SFS) was 77.5 (±10.1), both were lower than white bread (p < 0.05). The insulin response of both soymilk treatments was similar to white bread (p > 0.05). The glucose/insulin ratio of RBS and SFS were respectively 43.1 (±6.1) and 60.0 (±17.0) and were lower (p < 0.05) than white bread (123.5 ± 21.1) during the first 30 min. In conclusion, co-ingestion of low amounts of soy protein with a carbohydrate meal stimulated early-phase insulin secretion and thereby increased blood glucose clearance effectiveness. Furthermore, rice bran-fortified soymilk reduced the glycemic response similarly to soymilk with a greater dose of soy protein. Rice bran and its components offer therapeutic potential for glycemic and insulinemic control. View Full-Text
Keywords: soymilk; soy protein; rice bran; dietary fiber; glycemic response; insulin response; glycemic index soymilk; soy protein; rice bran; dietary fiber; glycemic response; insulin response; glycemic index
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Camps, S.G.; Lim, J.; Ishikado, A.; Inaba, Y.; Suwa, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Henry, C.J. Co-Ingestion of Rice Bran Soymilk or Plain Soymilk with White Bread: Effects on the Glycemic and Insulinemic Response. Nutrients 2018, 10, 449.

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